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Reiser4 File-System Port To The Linux 4.20 Kernel

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  • Reiser4 File-System Port To The Linux 4.20 Kernel

    Phoronix: Reiser4 File-System Port To The Linux 4.20 Kernel

    There hasn't been a formal Reiser4 file-system patch release since September when it was ported to the Linux 4.18 kernel, but via Git this week there is a port for the Linux 4.20 kernel should you want to utilize this once promising file-system under the latest stable patch series...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...For-Linux-4.20

  • #2
    What are the benefits of using that filesystem instead of mature and mainlined ext4?
    I do remember, back in the days, how reiserfs was superior to ext2 and ext3 (at least partially), but what's about now?

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    • #3
      Typo:

      Originally posted by phoronix View Post
      That's the most Resier4 activity we've seen

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      • #4
        So, now FOSS requires big closed IP company sponsorship, right? Just making sure I heard that correctly.

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        • #5
          We just need to take brief look at the Linux Foundation when it comes to corporate backing.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cjcox View Post
            So, now FOSS requires big closed IP company sponsorship, right? Just making sure I heard that correctly.
            It's just facts.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cjcox View Post
              So, now FOSS requires big closed IP company sponsorship, right? Just making sure I heard that correctly.
              You didn't.

              One of the Kernel inclusion requirements has always been that there must be someone that can actually maintain it once it is mainlined, and something as complex as a modern filesystem does require some kind of company backing to be properly maintained. This is not new information.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                You didn't.

                One of the Kernel inclusion requirements has always been that there must be someone that can actually maintain it once it is mainlined, and something as complex as a modern filesystem does require some kind of company backing to be properly maintained. This is not new information.
                I guess we should have shutdown Linus early on then. I'm not disagreeing that it isn't true, it's just fundamentally wrong.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cjcox View Post
                  So, now FOSS requires big closed IP company sponsorship, right? Just making sure I heard that correctly.
                  Most development - linux and otherwise - is corporate sponsored.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cjcox View Post

                    I guess we should have shutdown Linus early on then. I'm not disagreeing that it isn't true, it's just fundamentally wrong.
                    And what would be "right" thing then? Linux has become a highly professional software product where there are certain requirements on the code it contains. This is especially true when it comes to filesystems - when something breaks there, people loose data. Motivated hobbyists are great when it comes to concieving and kickstarting something new and exciting; sustainable long term development has never been their strong suit then. When a project succeeds, this is where corporate backing comes in.

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