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Systemd 240 Continues Picking Up New Features Ahead Of The Holidays

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  • Systemd 240 Continues Picking Up New Features Ahead Of The Holidays

    Phoronix: Systemd 240 Continues Picking Up New Features Ahead Of The Holidays

    It's been over five months already since the release of systemd 239 and a lot of feature work has been amassing for what will end up releasing as systemd 240...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...eatures-So-Far

  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by arokh View Post
    Probably because you're a flaming noob that shouldn't worry about development of complex Linux components.
    .. and lookey here, who's flaming as well ..


    Leave a comment:


  • arokh
    replied
    Originally posted by lowflyer View Post
    At which point in time does systemd stop "picking up new features" and starts fixing the broken features?
    They are doing both, adding new features and fixing bugs. One does not exclude the other. Where's your bug report?

    ... and why on earth does this remind me of Qt?
    Probably because you're a flaming noob that shouldn't worry about development of complex Linux components.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by lowflyer View Post
    At which point in time does systemd stop "picking up new features" and starts fixing the broken features?

    ... and why on earth does this remind me of Qt?
    Which parts specifically are broken?

    Other than that systemd is not going to stop picking up new features. One of the project's goal statements is to pick up new features continuously as new needs and use cases emerge. It will never be "finished" in the sense of not evolving any further, or if you wish, each release is "finished" by itself, and then a new development cycle begins.

    Just like the Linux kernel, really.

    Leave a comment:


  • pgoetz
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    I use Arch Linux (which is kind of surprising because it is supposed to be lightweight)
    I ran Arch updates Saturday morning (12/1) and my systems seems to have slowed down by 25% or more. Might be the newest spectre patch.

    Leave a comment:


  • lathiat
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post

    I don't know what distribution you use, but there seems to have been some kind of regression with recent Ubuntu releases. My Ubuntu VMs with 18.x releases take a full minute or longer to start. My Debian VM, which is also using systemd, hits the login screen in eight seconds.
    Do this and you'll find out why (or at least get a starting point):
    Code:
    sudo systemd-analyze blame

    Leave a comment:


  • lowflyer
    replied
    At which point in time does systemd stop "picking up new features" and starts fixing the broken features?

    ... and why on earth does this remind me of Qt?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by brrrrttttt View Post
    I could definitely see Polkit being pulled in at some point.
    Not without a rewrite. Polkit depends on spidermonkey and GLib.

    Leave a comment:


  • pcxmac
    replied
    not touching this until they roll in a usable GUI, Wayland preferred.

    Leave a comment:


  • Apokalypz
    replied
    When people ask "Windows or Mac", I say systemd. So my systemd box is currently running Linux. I then confuse further by explaining VMs and VMs within VMs which hold VMs used for developing on certain devices which are designed to interface with the device that's running the VM. That reminds me, is virtualmachined a thing yet?

    Leave a comment:

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