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Building The Linux Kernel With Clang Is Becoming Popular Again

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    mayankleoboy1
    Phoronix Member

  • mayankleoboy1
    replied
    any chance you can test https://github.com/facebookincubator/BOLT ? This is mentioned in the developer slides you linked to.

    Leave a comment:

  • cenapatop
    Junior Member

  • cenapatop
    replied
    I would change to LLVM if it would possible to compile the linux kernel with CPI (Code Pointer Integrity) function. https://dslab.epfl.ch/proj/cpi/

    That would be nice if this would be possible. That would be a realy big security boost! Can anybody help me by this issue?

    Leave a comment:

  • Weasel
    Senior Member

  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by discordian View Post
    Yeah, its almost like when those crappy browsers encrouched on the pitch-perfect hegemony of IE6 and the webpages that only ran there.
    Or almost like how the super awesome "standards" like HTML5 appeared a decade too late, to fill the gap dominated by Flash eh? (I'm not talking about flash but video streaming -- you see, the added it to the standard a decade too late)

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  • patriziobruno
    Junior Member

  • patriziobruno
    replied
    No surprise a companiy don't like a GPL licensed compiler

    Leave a comment:

  • rmoog
    Senior Member

  • rmoog
    replied
    Originally posted by Aleksei View Post
    LLVMLinux logo was leet:
    hgf

    Leave a comment:

  • dkasak
    Senior Member

  • dkasak
    replied
    Originally posted by bitman View Post

    Oh wow. You better back those strong words.
    Nah, I think strong words is all RedFoxMoron has ...

    Leave a comment:

  • discordian
    Senior Member

  • discordian
    replied
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    Nobody cares about crippled language standards and it's not excellent by any means.Well yeah this explains everything.

    Ofc you're not a big fan of something that your "excellent" compiler is poor against.
    Yeah, its almost like when those crappy browsers encrouched on the pitch-perfect hegemony of IE6 and the webpages that only ran there.

    Leave a comment:

  • Weasel
    Senior Member

  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
    No he means supporting an excellent compiler that pays attention to kanguage standards.
    Nobody cares about crippled language standards and it's not excellent by any means.
    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
    Maybe but there is far less inline than in the past and it hasn’t hurt anything. I’m not a big fan of inline assembly anyways so probably biased. Frankly I honest believe that’s policy of no inline code would do Linux more good that the “Code of Conduct”. It becomes a question of readability and long term maintenance in my mind.
    Well yeah this explains everything.

    Ofc you're not a big fan of something that your "excellent" compiler is poor against.

    Leave a comment:

  • CrystalGamma
    Senior Member

  • CrystalGamma
    replied
    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

    Maybe but there is far less inline than in the past and it hasn’t hurt anything. I’m not a big fan of inline assembly anyways so probably biased. Frankly I honest believe that’s policy of no inline code would do Linux more good that the “Code of Conduct”. It becomes a question of readability and long term maintenance in my mind.
    I was talking about technical impossibility, unless you want to prescribe a particular ABI and make inlining of ASM routines by the compiler impossible (by putting the code into out-of-line assembler source files).
    There is a lot of CPU functionality (and language implementation details), especially the kinds that an OS kernel needs to deal with, that C will never expose …

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  • wizard69
    Senior Member

  • wizard69
    replied
    Originally posted by CrystalGamma View Post

    I don't think Linux will ever stop using inline assembly, and I don't think C will standardize inline assembly either, so Linux will never be completely compliant C …
    Maybe but there is far less inline than in the past and it hasn’t hurt anything. I’m not a big fan of inline assembly anyways so probably biased. Frankly I honest believe that’s policy of no inline code would do Linux more good that the “Code of Conduct”. It becomes a question of readability and long term maintenance in my mind.

    Leave a comment:

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