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GNU Linux-libre 4.19-gnu Released, Continues Deblobbing The Kernel

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  • GNU Linux-libre 4.19-gnu Released, Continues Deblobbing The Kernel

    Phoronix: GNU Linux-libre 4.19-gnu Released, Continues Deblobbing The Kernel

    Building off Monday's release of Linux 4.19 is now the downstream GNU Linux-libre 4.19-gnu kernel that strips away code contingent upon closed-source microcode/firmware images as well as removing the ability to load closed-source kernel modules...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...nux-Libre-4.19

  • #2
    Does anybody actually use Linux-libre on production systems

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bachchain View Post
      Does anybody actually use Linux-libre on production systems
      I was just about to ask the same question. Looks like some people want to step into a niche, but couldn't find an own project to achieve this. So they started unblobbing the Kernel. Result is a product that no one uses.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Candy View Post

        I was just about to ask the same question. Looks like some people want to step into a niche, but couldn't find an own project to achieve this. So they started unblobbing the Kernel. Result is a product that no one uses.
        I use it on several servers, now just in VM's after all the Intel security flaws. I think it is great to have the linux-libre kernel as it shows how restrictive closed firmware is again.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by R41N3R View Post

          I use it on several servers, now just in VM's after all the Intel security flaws. I think it is great to have the linux-libre kernel as it shows how restrictive closed firmware is again.
          How does a linux kernel variant that removes functionality show how restrictive closed firmware is?? You are literally saying a pice of software that removes functionality is somehow less restrictive than the project it is based upon. The reality is just the opposite.

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          • #6
            Well, if one wants to run a crippled operating system because everyone won't agree to make everything absolutely free, that's certainly their prerogative.

            Personally I never thought the rationale for it made any sense, but that's the beauty of Linux.

            To each his own.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

              How does a linux kernel variant that removes functionality show how restrictive closed firmware is?? You are literally saying a pice of software that removes functionality is somehow less restrictive than the project it is based upon. The reality is just the opposite.
              You are misunderstanding what Freedom refers to in Free Software.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

                How does a linux kernel variant that removes functionality show how restrictive closed firmware is?? You are literally saying a pice of software that removes functionality is somehow less restrictive than the project it is based upon. The reality is just the opposite.
                By showing how dependent you are from the the goodwill of the manufacturer and their closed firmware, how less you own your computer, how easy they could remove functionality with a firmware update or add back doors and how disfunctional it would be. So yes, free software is important whether you like it or not, but there are people out there that are not simply consumers trusting every firmware shit. Intel's security flaws should have confirmed how had this black box is for all of us. I do appreciate the work of Linux-libre!

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                • #9
                  Linux-libre is so free it removes the freedom to load the modules you want.

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                  • #10
                    It doesn't remove the freedom to do anything. It just doesn't include nonfree blobs. But if you want to run them or install third party nonfree crap like the nvidia driver, of course you can.

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