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Linux 4.18 Kernel Officially Released

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  • Linux 4.18 Kernel Officially Released

    Phoronix: Linux 4.18 Kernel Officially Released

    Following the one week setback, the Linux 4.18 kernel is now officially available just a little more than two months since the cycle officially began...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-4.18-Released

  • #2
    Linux libre source is up on the fsfla.org site already. Compiling it on Tumbleweed right now. The RC's have all worked real well.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
      A reminder for the AMD graphics users, mainline kernels do have partially implemented and buggy amdgpu driver. It is lottery if it is stable. Use amd-staging-drm-next or latest wip kernel from here: https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/linux/

      My distribution uses a AMD kernel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKJ-IatUfis
      Guys look! A FUD peddler!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
        A reminder for the AMD graphics users, mainline kernels do have partially implemented and buggy amdgpu driver. It is lottery if it is stable. Use amd-staging-drm-next or latest wip kernel from here: https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/linux/

        My distribution uses a AMD kernel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKJ-IatUfis
        Translation:

        "Don't use the less featureful driver. Use the bleeding edge one with potentially breaking changes. Work in Progress is better than stable. Hurr durr!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post

          Translation:

          "Don't use the less featureful driver. Use the bleeding edge one with potentially breaking changes. Work in Progress is better than stable. Hurr durr!"
          Problem is, in Linux stable rarely means actually "stable". It's more like you choose an arbitrary release and decide to call it stable (e.g. look at the current LTS kernel or the current LTS Plasma).

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          • #6
            Once again in the thread there are people who don't understand what the term "stable" actually means. "Stable" in the opensource world does not mean "no blue screens", kids. FFS it is 2018, i thought people understood that stuff. Yes older "stable" releases contain bugs, but being bugfree is not the reason they are called stable. God some people are thick.

            If some people have nothing better to do with their lives, like work, for example, then using WIP builds is fine. Promoting this to normal people who actually use their computer for other things than just tinkering and thinking that makes them special, who should use stable software, is irresponsible and is just done for epeen reasons. Especially when we are talking kernels and gpu drivers.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by msotirov View Post

              Problem is, in Linux stable rarely means actually "stable". It's more like you choose an arbitrary release and decide to call it stable (e.g. look at the current LTS kernel or the current LTS Plasma).
              Stable often means that you can download minor updates and load updated modules without rebooting. It does not mean the system does not crash.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
                There are many stable believers. Stable code does have many bugs. Rolling release software is modern computing.
                Spoken like a true fashionista. Stable means that you won't get breaking changes, not that it has no bugs. i.e. it's stable in terms of changes. Something that changes constantly is unstable. This actually makes perfect sense in the English language and is not "open source" or "computing" specific term at all.

                I feel like I'm stating the obvious here.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
                  A reminder for the AMD graphics users, mainline kernels do have partially implemented and buggy amdgpu driver. It is lottery if it is stable. Use amd-staging-drm-next or latest wip kernel from here: https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/linux/

                  My distribution uses a AMD kernel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKJ-IatUfis
                  You can also stop using trash distros that ship unstable buggy kernels and go for something professional like OpenSUSE, just saying.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

                    There are many stable believers. Stable code does have many bugs. Rolling release software is modern computing.

                    There is million ways how software is used. Nobody have the resources to test display drivers for every game and every piece of hardware. So claiming that stable is stable is bull shit.
                    Are you seriously claiming the amdgpu development tree is more stable than a release version? You mind telling me how many GPUs you've tested and what kind of testing methods you used to reach this conclusion? Seems like every single post of yours on this board is some kind of FUD to scare people into using Debian Sid. Get help bro.

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