Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TLS 1.3 Via GnuTLS Is Planned For Fedora 29

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TLS 1.3 Via GnuTLS Is Planned For Fedora 29

    Phoronix: TLS 1.3 Via GnuTLS Is Planned For Fedora 29

    The feature list for Fedora 29 continues growing and the latest is about shipping GnuTLS with TLS 1.3 support enabled...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...uTLS-Fedora-29

  • #2
    I'm pretty sure it's TLS 1.3 that's holding up RHEL8, they had a lot of bother adding in support for HTTP2 to RHEL7.4. I think after OpenSSL 1.1.1 is released and Apache HTTPD has support for it we'll see RHEL8 beta drop

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
      I'm pretty sure it's TLS 1.3 that's holding up RHEL8, they had a lot of bother adding in support for HTTP2 to RHEL7.4. I think after OpenSSL 1.1.1 is released and Apache HTTPD has support for it we'll see RHEL8 beta drop
      Why does RHEL even need a beta? I mean: I get that testing needs to be done, but I'm pretty sure that 99% of the RHEL users are enterprise clients that need stability, so would they even consider testing a RHEL beta?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

        Why does RHEL even need a beta? I mean: I get that testing needs to be done, but I'm pretty sure that 99% of the RHEL users are enterprise clients that need stability, so would they even consider testing a RHEL beta?
        Not everyone is involved but there are several high profile enterprise customers that are very interested in beta releases and send considerable amount of feedback on them. Several including some vendors participate in Fedora and make sure their changes are integrated. They have the resources and it makes sense for them to make sure everything works correctly within their environment and use cases so that their own transition to new releases go smoothly.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

          Why does RHEL even need a beta? I mean: I get that testing needs to be done, but I'm pretty sure that 99% of the RHEL users are enterprise clients that need stability, so would they even consider testing a RHEL beta?
          Enterprises above a certain size have test, dev and staging environments. I am certain large firms would LOVE an advanced copy of RHEL to make sure their applications work with it before they go live with it. I'd personally love a copy for test and dev to make sure devs can target a yet-unreleased version to make the massive effort of supporting a new version easier.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by GI_Jack View Post

            Enterprises above a certain size have test, dev and staging environments. I am certain large firms would LOVE an advanced copy of RHEL to make sure their applications work with it before they go live with it. I'd personally love a copy for test and dev to make sure devs can target a yet-unreleased version to make the massive effort of supporting a new version easier.
            This pretty much sums it up, we wouldn't use a BETA in production but we'd certainly use it in dev/test or in proof of concepts

            Comment

            Working...
            X