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Emms 5.0 Released As A Big Update To The Emacs Multimedia System

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  • Emms 5.0 Released As A Big Update To The Emacs Multimedia System

    Phoronix: Emms 5.0 Released As A Big Update To The Emacs Multimedia System

    If you need some integrated multimedia capabilities while you are editing your text files with GNU Emacs, Emms 5.0 is available as a big update to the Emacs Multimedia System...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...s-5.0-Released

  • #2
    A text editor component for Emacs would be nice. We could do an extensible one too, so that you can add more features to it (like an email client or file manager.)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
      A text editor component for Emacs would be nice. We could do an extensible one too, so that you can add more features to it (like an email client or file manager.)
      OK, sarcasm is, indeed, vindicated. Anyway, if you never did, I suggest you to try spacemacs. Better than 99% of all editors out there.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RealNC View Post
        A text editor component for Emacs would be nice. We could do an extensible one too, so that you can add more features to it (like an email client or file manager.)
        File manager? There are 5 of them: Dired, Ranger, Treemacs...
        Email: 3 email clients
        Gitter

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        • #5
          Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

          I did use emacs with a vax/vms terminal in eighties. I do understand that some users might like it and use it today too. Open source software is all about using alternatives.
          Open source is all about everyone having their own vision of what open source is all about. Sure, for some, it is all about having choice and alternatives. For others, it's all about having control of your own data. For others still, it's about customising software to your own unique needs and requirements. For some, it's about do-as-you-please-no-questions-asked, for some, it's about a certain form of social activism, for some it's about free-as-in-beer. Etc etc etc. These various interpretations are not mutually exclusive, of course, but no single person can claim with authority what open source is or is not about. Just look at the GPL vs BSD or systemd vs no-systemd flamewars, where each side accuses the other of completely missing the point. Each of course has its own interpretation of what open source is, or should be, and from where they stand, the other guys' stance seems totally irrational and misguided. And vice versa.

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          • #6
            ... and people whinge about systemd :P *runs*

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            • #7
              Originally posted by boxie View Post
              ... and people whinge about systemd :P *runs*
              I remember reading an interview with Richard Stallman and someone asked him if systemd was bad because it violated the Unix philosophy. He said he had never used it and didn't have an opinion other than supporting it because it was free software. He then pointed out the reviewer that as the primary author of GNU Emacs he was in the camp that thought the Unix philosophy was overrated.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael_S View Post

                I remember reading an interview with Richard Stallman and someone asked him if systemd was bad because it violated the Unix philosophy. He said he had never used it and didn't have an opinion other than supporting it because it was free software. He then pointed out the reviewer that as the primary author of GNU Emacs he was in the camp that thought the Unix philosophy was overrated.
                To be fair, if you actually read the source materials, the UNIX philosophy is just talking about composable components... not necessarily shell pipelines.

                Whether it's shell utilities, Python modules, or what have you, "do one thing and do it well" is about providing high-quality building blocks for ad-hoc composability. (I can't imagine how much time I would have needlessly wasted on Windows because it's not common practice to have the kind of backend/frontend separation you get out of things like "K3b on top of genisoimage, cdrdao, etc.")

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael_S View Post

                  I remember reading an interview with Richard Stallman and someone asked him if systemd was bad because it violated the Unix philosophy. He said he had never used it and didn't have an opinion other than supporting it because it was free software. He then pointed out the reviewer that as the primary author of GNU Emacs he was in the camp that thought the Unix philosophy was overrated.
                  that's quite funny

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by acobar View Post
                    I suggest you to try spacemacs.
                    Thanks for the heads up on this one.

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