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Linux 4.4 To 4.16 Kernel Benchmarks With AMD Ryzen Threadripper

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  • Linux 4.4 To 4.16 Kernel Benchmarks With AMD Ryzen Threadripper

    Phoronix: Linux 4.4 To 4.16 Kernel Benchmarks With AMD Ryzen Threadripper

    This past weekend I posted some Linux 3.17 to Linux 4.16 kernel benchmarks using two older Intel hardware platforms and one of the most frequent requests to come in following that article were some AMD benchmarks looking at the Intel Linux performance going a ways back. Here are some test results from Linux 4.4 to 4.16 using an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X system.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26158

  • #2
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    • #3
      Would be interesting to see the last page with an 2nd gen FX chip and probably more gens of intel chips.

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      • #4
        @Michael: Thank you!

        But is this right?
        'The OSBench micro-benchmark is reporting a longer time in creating new threads since Linux 4.15, likely due to Retpolines.'

        I think it should be: '...since 4.13,...' And NO Retpolines.

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        • #5
          I don't quite follow ... the kernels were compiled on the test machine using the same GCC version ? Or they are stock Ubuntu kernels from binary packages ?

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          • #6
            4.6 kernel was with performance governor, while the rest were ondemand.
            that might change things on some tasks

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            • #7
              Originally posted by xpander View Post
              4.6 kernel was with performance governor, while the rest were ondemand.
              that might change things on some tasks
              It was noted in the article, but from the results, no major differences with 4.6 anyhow.
              Michael Larabel
              http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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              • #8
                I think it would be interesting to do a similar test on how LTS kernels evolve over time. Something like comparing both the original revision and the latest revision for each LTS kernel. Currently that would mean testing
                4.4.0
                4.4.127
                4.9.0
                4.9.93
                4.14.0
                4.14.34

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