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Systemd 238 Released, Adds New Temporary File-System Option

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  • Systemd 238 Released, Adds New Temporary File-System Option

    Phoronix: Systemd 238 Released, Adds New Temporary File-System Option

    While systemd 237 was released just over one month ago, systemd 238 was released today as the next installment of this init system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...d-238-Released

  • #2
    Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    A new TemporaryFileSystem= option to msk parts of a real file-system tree with tmpfs mounts
    I have a question. Is it possible to use systemd without the journal and systemd-udevd?

    And also, is it possible for systemd to not force close my SSH sessions on poweroff?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Typo:



      I have a question. Is it possible to use systemd without the journal and systemd-udevd?

      And also, is it possible for systemd to not force close my SSH sessions on poweroff?
      On power off? I think you must mean something else. There's no software or operating system in the world that can keep your sessions open if you turn off the client or the server.

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice to see continuous improvement. Only thing I really need is wpan support in networkd.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          And also, is it possible for systemd to not force close my SSH sessions on poweroff?
          SSH is connection-oriented. When network connectivity is lost - or the process on one of the endpoints is killed - then the session is terminated.

          Perhaps you could use some combination of hibernation (instead of shutdown) and 'screen' to achieve what you want.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
            I have a question. Is it possible to use systemd without the journal and systemd-udevd?
            It been possible to use systemd without journal for a very long time it used in embedded when wanting the cgroup feature of systemd yet keep memory footprint as small as possible..
            https://github.com/profusion/demysti...nimal-strip.sh

            Yes you build systemd with journald then delete it and systemd still works with it missing. Same with udev. Systemd installer does try to suggest you should have them. Yes journald missing does mean the integrated logging report with status check of service feature of systemctl no long works but it does not make systemctl fail. udev missing means your on the fly hotplug stuff is no-longer working.

            You could say distributions package up dependencies on journald and udev wrong. Both are recommend so all feature work of systemd they are not mandatory yet lot of distribution package them as mandatory because system will not built without them.

            Funny part is reason why systemd builds with journald is so that it test suite works and has a dependable system to log results.

            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
            And also, is it possible for systemd to not force close my SSH sessions on poweroff?
            Really systemd does not do this. Its ssh design it self that leads to shutdown kernel/suspended ending in session closed.

            Originally posted by coder View Post
            SSH is connection-oriented. When network connectivity is lost - or the process on one of the endpoints is killed - then the session is terminated.

            Perhaps you could use some combination of hibernation (instead of shutdown) and 'screen' to achieve what you want.
            https://stackoverflow.com/questions/...computer-sleep

            Right idea but hybernation/sleep still causes time outs of ssh. Items like mosh were started to attempt to get around ssh protocol limitations.

            Comment


            • #7
              I wonder when the user session dbus issue will finally be fixed. Right now one has three options: Disable session dbus, kill all user processes at logout unconditionally (meaning: kill screen and other processes that should not be killed at logout), or do not kill user processes unconditionally (what leaves stuff like the session's pulseaudio running, blocking the sound hardware...).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by soulsource View Post
                I wonder when the user session dbus issue will finally be fixed. Right now one has three options: Disable session dbus, kill all user processes at logout unconditionally (meaning: kill screen and other processes that should not be killed at logout), or do not kill user processes unconditionally (what leaves stuff like the session's pulseaudio running, blocking the sound hardware...).
                This is a hard one. Because its not that is not fixes.

                If you have kill all user processes at logout there are ways around this. If you had run screen for example using system-run --scope --user screen to put it in a different scope it would not have been killed by user logout. Scope feature of systemd is one of the least understood parts and also not use as much as it should be. So using scope you are able to control what gets sledge hammer dropped on it. Majority of programs really running after logout are doing the wrong thing. So it kind makes sense to have to use scopes or the like to tell the system the few rare ones that are right to run after logout.

                Takes a boolean argument. Configures whether the processes of a user should be killed when the user logs out. If true, the scope unit corresponding to the session and all processes inside that scope will be terminated. If false, the scope is "abandoned", see systemd.scope(5), and processes are not killed. Defaults to "yes", but see the options KillOnlyUsers= and KillExcludeUsers= below.
                Its kind of in the man page for systemd logind. Most people don't understand what the scope unit means. When you login in a scope unit is created for the session and that is what is clean up by the auto kill. But using systemd user mode you can start new scopes that logind will not kill. So this is part getting use to the new ways of doing things once you are that auto kill of logind does not cause any major problems..

                Next items like pulseaudio not terminated on logout when you don't kill user processes. This is a general session management problem. I have not see a feature request to add a logout mode to systemd user mode. Most desktop session management on Linux has been horrible so even if you fix systemd user mode you still have the session managements from xfce, gnome... that also can do the wrong thing of not shutdown stuff down on logout when they should. This is why logind using sledge hammer method has been chosen.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                  And also, is it possible for systemd to not force close my SSH sessions on poweroff?
                  Not clear. In case of which side of the connection powers off ?

                  - If you don't want to lose your work on the server whenever your laptop battery dies, you can use 'screen' (or 'tmux', but I'm not familiar with that one).

                  - if you want your laptop to get an SSH session no matter what, even when the server reboots, you can use 'autossh' to automatically re-open a session whenever the previous SSH dies.


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
                    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/...computer-sleep

                    Right idea but hybernation/sleep still causes time outs of ssh. Items like mosh were started to attempt to get around ssh protocol limitations.
                    Please re-read my answer (or the second one, in the SO link you posted). Then, head to your nearest terminal window and type 'man screen'.

                    Comment

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