Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Look At The Plethora Of Linux 4.16 Kernel Features & Changes

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A Look At The Plethora Of Linux 4.16 Kernel Features & Changes

    Phoronix: A Look At The Plethora Of Linux 4.16 Kernel Features & Changes

    After the lengthy Linux 4.15 kernel cycle, the past two weeks have marked the Linux 4.16 merge window. Yet again it's been another heavy feature period for the kernel. There is still a lot of mitigation work going on for most CPU architectures surrounding Spectre and also Meltdown, the open-source graphics drivers have continued getting better, various CPU improvements are present, the VirtualBox Guest driver was mainlined, and dozens of other notable changes for Linux 4.16. Take a look.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=25996

  • #2
    Typos:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    for the Ryzen Threaripper 1900X processor.
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    A new Quallcom QMI driver

    Comment


    • #3
      I've been using ext4 for system, home and data partitions exclusively and obviously it's battle-tested and keeps getting tweaks and fixes in every new release, but in terms of reliability and performance, how have the flash-oriented filesystems matured these days?

      I'm perfectly happy with ext4, but are there reasons to try others on SSDs or SD cards?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by misGnomer View Post
        I've been using ext4 for system, home and data partitions exclusively and obviously it's battle-tested and keeps getting tweaks and fixes in every new release, but in terms of reliability and performance, how have the flash-oriented filesystems matured these days?

        I'm perfectly happy with ext4, but are there reasons to try others on SSDs or SD cards?
        F2FS is great. I recommend it for use on SSDs. I use exFAT on SD cards.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by misGnomer View Post
          I've been using ext4 for system, home and data partitions exclusively and obviously it's battle-tested and keeps getting tweaks and fixes in every new release, but in terms of reliability and performance, how have the flash-oriented filesystems matured these days?

          I'm perfectly happy with ext4, but are there reasons to try others on SSDs or SD cards?
          I use XFS on SSDs and HDDs whenever it isn't too much trouble (Fedora and openSUSE allow me to select it with guided partitioning; for Ubuntu I just roll with ext4).

          I figure there was a good enough reason RHEL switched to it by-default, and the description of XFS sounds pretty nice. Basically, I have no practical reason to use XFS, but it works fine for me

          Originally posted by flubba86 View Post
          F2FS is great. I recommend it for use on SSDs
          Slightly unrelated, but I wish Fedora would include an option to use F2FS during partitioning.

          Comment


          • #6
            Looking forward to "Clock gating and GP108 support for the Nouveau DRM driver". I can't wait to ditch the proprietary driver.

            I've got the following problem on 4.15-2 (installed via ukuu) https://github.com/KVM-VMI/kvm-vmi/issues/5 not sure if it's a config problem or actual bug on my system. I don't have the issue on 4.14-18 which I also installed via ukuu. Wondering what 4.16 will do.

            Comment

            Working...
            X