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Fedora Linux Had Another Innovative Year

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  • Fedora Linux Had Another Innovative Year

    Phoronix: Fedora Linux Had Another Innovative Year

    Fedora Linux this year picked up support for more multimedia codecs, continued innovating on both the Linux desktop/workstations and servers, the Fedora/RedHat developers continued a lot of upstream improvements throughout the Linux landscape, their Wayland support continues to be solid, and they continued shipping the latest and greatest packages in their distribution releases...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...017-Highlights

  • #2
    does fedora offer native mpeg2 support as i think the last patent expires next year.

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    • #3
      Fedora is the go-to Workstation distro right now. Latest Gnome, up to date packages and regular release cycles with seemless upgrades.

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      • #4
        I have been a Fedora user since 2006/06. I have never regretted that decision. I did multiboot with Debian, and Ubuntu and more recently with SUSE and Manjaro, but I get what I need from within Fedora. Perhaps it is force of habit. Over the years, I have learned some of the architecture decisions surrounding Fedora, and from the forums, I have formed friendships with other diehard Fedorians. I do use Wayland sometimes, but alwoys log into Fedora with gnome-xorg. Wayland is for GUI, and xorg is for command line. Thats my current F27 and F28Rawhide experience.

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        • #5
          I boot fedora and ubuntu but mainly use Ubuntu. Also for habit and some of my scripts don't work on fedora. to lazy to tweak those and happy with ubuntu.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by InsideJob View Post
            Maybe it's different now (havent used it in years) but I always felt like Fedora was just a way to get free beta testing out of the "community" for Red Hat's enterprise products. Sorry, corporate entities need to learn how to pay for beta testing. There's no free corporate lunch.
            OK, so let's be fair: Red Hat should start to pay for beta testing as soon as Fedora starts to pay for the developer time they got for free from Red Hat. Also, you should start to pay immediately for all the work that Red Hat has done to the Linux kernel and ecosystem that you use for free.

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            • #7
              I'd like to challenge the use of the word "botched" to describe Fedora not shipping Modular Server for Fedora 27. This was not a botch. We had something ready to go for a final release that passed all of our traditional formal release criteria... but we weren't satisfied with it.

              A lot of people (particularly among commentators on this publication) like to pile onto Fedora. This is mostly easy to ignore, because loud people who don't try to help are basically just generating noise. *Inside* the Fedora Project on the other hand, we hold ourselves to a VERY high standard (higher than some consider strictly necessary). Despite trying to push our boundaries on all sides, we maintain a level of excellence in what we deliver that few others in the technology space (not just Linux distros) would dare attempt.

              So when we got to the point where we were going to have to make a Go/No-Go decision for Modular Server, we took a long look at what we were proposing to deliver. It met all of the technical criteria, but were we *proud* of it? If we released what we had, we could pat ourselves on the back for delivering *something*, sure. But it wasn't what we really wanted, and feedback from the Beta suggested that it wasn't *quite* what our users wanted either.

              We made the carefully-considered decision that delivering something we weren't proud of would be worse than delivering nothing at all. Fortunately, "nothing at all" was only the back-up plan and we were able to release the non-Modular Server Edition instead, albeit somewhat late.

              This does *not* mean that Modularity is over. More on that to be announced next week.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by InsideJob View Post
                Maybe it's different now (havent used it in years) but I always felt like Fedora was just a way to get free beta testing out of the "community" for Red Hat's enterprise products. Sorry, corporate entities need to learn how to pay for beta testing. There's no free corporate lunch.
                You are 100% right!!! Fedora has been since day one, and continues to be, a perpetually beta product, it's a testing/proving ground for Red Hat's Enterprise products.

                For proof, just look at this article, Michael claims that 2017 was a huge success for Fedora with "many innovations" yet he doesn't name a single one. An "innovation" is a feature, a change in how things are done, that one product/service has/offers that no one else offers. What are the "innovations" Fedora offers? It finally supports some codecs that other distributions, like Ubuntu, have supported out of the box for years now.

                Furthermore Michael claims that Fedora is his his distro of choice for his main workstation yet every hardware review he does he uses Ubuntu. Fedora is a joke of a distro.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sgallagh View Post
                  I'd like to challenge the use of the word "botched" to describe Fedora not shipping Modular Server for Fedora 27. This was not a botch. We had something ready to go for a final release that passed all of our traditional formal release criteria... but we weren't satisfied with it.
                  Then I submit to you that your "traditional formal release criteria is in and of itself botched".

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sgallagh View Post
                    We made the carefully-considered decision that delivering something we weren't proud of would be worse than delivering nothing at all. Fortunately, "nothing at all" was only the back-up plan and we were able to release the non-Modular Server Edition instead, albeit somewhat late.
                    So that means you were "proud" of Fedora 25? 26? 27? The respins, including the ones with KDE? Either you guys have a very unique definition of "proud" or the bar is very low at Fedora.

                    As for "we maintain a level of excellence in what we deliver that few others in the technology space (not just Linux distros) would dare attempt", that is just too funny for words. You really consider Fedora the premiere desktop OS offering? I'd like to know where you purchased your Reality Distortion Field from and do they offer financing?

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