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Fedora 27 Beta Hit By A Second Delay

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  • Fedora 27 Beta Hit By A Second Delay

    Phoronix: Fedora 27 Beta Hit By A Second Delay

    Last week it was decided to delay the Fedora 27 beta due to bugs while this week they've been forced to delay the release a second time...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...7-Beta-Delay-2

  • #2
    Still nobody gives a shit.

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    • #3
      Fedora integrates thousands of upstream projects with a huge amount of change release to release. A strict-time based schedule would always have problems. A strict when-it-is-perfect policy would never ship. So, we have a compromise process. What you're seeing as "delay" is this process in action. Were we a closed project (even an open source one without transparent development), you'd never see this. We are committed to openness and transparency, though, so you see the updates as they happen.

      I definitely appreciate the reporting on Fedora, but the negative slant seems ... not appropriate, given that it's the result of our transparency, not any sort of failure.

      I'd hoped that the "rain date" built into the schedule would help correct this, but I guess not. Could we at least get "first delay beyond the built-in rain date"?

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      • #4
        mattdm I think reasonable people understand your workflow and goal. While I'm not a Fedora user, I take a look every once in a while to see how things are going.
        It's been nothing but great improvements for many, many releases now. So you guys are definitely doing something good.

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        • #5
          I am a Fedora user, I appreciate this project. I hope 27 ships with an update manager that is significantly more mature. I end up dropping to command line now, which is fine for me, my wife however is not so amused.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mattdm View Post
            Fedora integrates thousands of upstream projects with a huge amount of change release to release. A strict-time based schedule would always have problems. A strict when-it-is-perfect policy would never ship. So, we have a compromise process.
            Thank you for that. Fedora Workstation is a pleasure to use.

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            • #7
              No problem with rain dates. With Fedora I have learned to always have my umbrella open anyway. Okay okay, I'm not gonna say anything else, the last time I said something about Fedora's shifting schedule they almost killed me :P

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              • #8
                Funny that Arch and Tumbleweed can push out new technology within a day or two of its release into a stable system with massive software support. I'm glad the days of semi-annual releases and delayed betas are in my distant past.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by andyprough View Post
                  Funny that Arch and Tumbleweed can push out new technology within a day or two of its release into a stable system with massive software support. I'm glad the days of semi-annual releases and delayed betas are in my distant past.
                  The only problem with Arch and Tumblewhatever is that not everyone wants an ever changing system. I, for example, have to use that particular version of gcc and that version of glibc etc.. Rolling release distributions would make my life impossible and they're not officially supported by commercial software like Matlab, Wolfram Mathematica, etc.. Even if workarounds to make them work are sometimes possible, it's not always the case (for example, I remember that the update to Ncurses 6 killed my Matlab installation on Arch). You just think that all users around the world all have the same needs you have. That's typical of rolling release fundamentalists.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GdeR View Post

                    Rolling release distributions would make my life impossible and they're not officially supported by commercial software like Matlab, Wolfram Mathematica, etc.
                    Software you are using are implemented badly. Many Linux gamers use rolling release distros and hundreds of native Linux games run just fine.

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