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Fedora Developers Begin Talking About Their 28 & 29 Releases For 2018

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  • Fedora Developers Begin Talking About Their 28 & 29 Releases For 2018

    Phoronix: Fedora Developers Begin Talking About Their 28 & 29 Releases For 2018

    While Fedora 26 just shipped yesterday, developers are already talking about their very early release estimates for Fedora 28 and Fedora 29 in 2018...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Fedora-29-2018

  • #2
    who knows, fedora might not be around by the time F27 is released im considering jumping over to Ubuntu. why will there be a need to use Fedora when its crashy

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    • #3
      Fedora is awesome, but the release/end-of-support cycle drive me away. A "LTS" version would be welcome.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Anvil View Post
        who knows, fedora might not be around by the time F27 is released im considering jumping over to Ubuntu. why will there be a need to use Fedora when its crashy
        With Ubuntu already being on systemd and gravitating back towards GNOME and Wayland, there's IMHO little incentive to stay with Fedora for those specific infrastructure pieces. The things that I like about Fedora are that it has newer kernels and such (by default -- PPAs and their equivalents not considered), it has Flatpaks (which I feel are conceptually more elegant than snaps) and that there seems to be some work going on in making updates atomic. However, Ubuntu is also looking at atomic updates, so it's not really *that* big of a differentiator.

        It *is* interesting that Fedora "won" in terms of platform choices (Git, Systemd, Wayland, GNOME), but you could argue that it is simply RH putting its financial clout behind the technologies it wants to adopt for RHEL down the line. I'm not really sure Canonical can compete with that in financial terms, but I confess I haven't bothered to look up the relevant numbers (effectively making this nothing more than idle musings).

        When it comes to package management, .deb and .rpm are equally brittle, legacy formats and the choice between plague or cholera isn't an appealing one at all.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Anvil View Post
          who knows, fedora might not be around by the time F27 is released im considering jumping over to Ubuntu. why will there be a need to use Fedora when its crashy
          It's very funny because Ubuntu does not work on my system. I've tried 16.04, 17.04 and about once a week I try the daily alpha image for 17.10.

          Yesterday I tried out fedberry (fedora 25 for raspberry pi). It was a present experience. I checked the basics of DNF, it saved me some bandwidth and I did not experience any issues. I'm keen to try Fedora on my desktop extensively when I have more time.

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          • #6
            Since this seems to be the thread for suggesting to others your favourite distro to replace Fedora with, I'll suggest openSUSE with KDE as it's great, runs fine on all my hardware, and has Yast to configure any part of the system without changing text files manually. All the while being stable.
            Both Tumbleweed (the more bleedign edge) and Leap (the one based off SLES, the enterprise offering of SUSE).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              Since this seems to be the thread for suggesting to others your favourite distro to replace Fedora with, I'll suggest openSUSE with KDE as it's great, runs fine on all my hardware, and has Yast to configure any part of the system without changing text files manually. All the while being stable.
              Both Tumbleweed (the more bleedign edge) and Leap (the one based off SLES, the enterprise offering of SUSE).
              I would like to second that motion!
              openSUSE is also related to a "proper" enterprise distribution and YaST makes a lot of sense for a home user even though hardcore sysadmins would dismissively call it a "crutch".
              The "Get software" website is also very user-friendly, and you also have a great package manager in zypper.
              The close relation between LEAP and SLES also means that you can enjoy good support from the commercial side with companies providing their products for installation. (I know mentioning proprietary software as an advantage is heresy, so forgive me, for I have sinned...)

              Plus SUSE is gaining market share in the enterprise market, making openSUSE a great choice for sysadmins who might soon have to switch to SLES from RHEL.
              Last edited by OneBitUser; 07-13-2017, 09:00 AM.

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