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The State Of Flatpak vs. Snaps On Various Linux Distributions

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  • #11
    Originally posted by kyrios View Post
    I do care.
    It would be nice to have a cross-distro packaging system. Perhaps not to replace what already exists but to complete it (for example for 3rd party applications).
    Why use such small distribution as Solus where are very few apps compared to Debian testing Xfce that is a rolling release os too and way more popular, stable, faster (according to distrowatch Solus uses 800MB ram after boot when Debian testing Xfce uses 200MB), easier to use and more compatible with other distributions.

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    • #12
      cen1 : I don't agree. I see flatpack like something more flexible that allow distributions directly from the publisher source with the advantage that the publishers have to package their apps only once for many distributions.
      On Arch-based distros, it would probably be overkill since the AUR already allows that but RPM, DEB, EOPKG, ... don't have this flexibility!
      Last but not least, it has some other little advantages like allowing to install multiple versions of a same application, etc...

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      • #13
        Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

        Why use such small distribution as Solus where are very few apps compared to Debian testing Xfce that is a rolling release os too and way more popular, stable, faster (according to distrowatch Solus uses 800MB ram after boot when Debian testing Xfce uses 200MB), easier to use and more compatible with other distributions.
        I installed it to try it out and I decided to keep it despite of all the current limitations because it is imho a very promising distribution. The community is small but FRIENDLY and helpful which is not the case anymore on some other bigger distributions (even if it's only caused by a minority of people). I got fed up with the systemd war and the split of Debian-Devuan.
        Unlike most small distributions that are juste based on something else and that don't bring any added value, I think Solus do try many things: some I don't really understand (their own packaging system... WHY?), but also some interesting ones : Budgie desktop, implementing some of the aggressive settings of ClearLinux, tools to manage multi-gpu, etc.

        This being said, I fully agree that currently this distribution still lacks maturity and I wouldn't advise it to everyone (yet).

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        • #14
          Originally posted by kyrios View Post

          I got fed up with the systemd war and the split of Debian-Devuan.
          Guess what, Debian testing Xfce is freely configurable. For systemd agnostics:
          https://wiki.debian.org/OpenRC

          I do not switch distribution when I need to remove pulseaudio,networkmanager,avahi and modemmanager from the default installation. System is full of wayland garbage but let it be.
          Last edited by debianxfce; 02-10-2017, 06:15 AM.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by kyrios View Post

            I installed it to try it out and I decided to keep it despite of all the current limitations because it is imho a very promising distribution. The community is small but FRIENDLY and helpful which is not the case anymore on some other bigger distributions (even if it's only caused by a minority of people). I got fed up with the systemd war and the split of Debian-Devuan.
            Unlike most small distributions that are juste based on something else and that don't bring any added value, I think Solus do try many things: some I don't really understand (their own packaging system... WHY?), but also some interesting ones : Budgie desktop, implementing some of the aggressive settings of ClearLinux, tools to manage multi-gpu, etc.

            This being said, I fully agree that currently this distribution still lacks maturity and I wouldn't advise it to everyone (yet).
            Don't feed the trolls.

            Use the distro that fits you best.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by alvez View Post

              Don't feed the trolls.

              Use the distro that fits you best.
              There is no such a distribution that fits you the best. It is easier to remove/change existing stuff than conjure out of thin air.
              Last edited by debianxfce; 02-10-2017, 07:05 AM.

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              • #17
                It seems its two commands for snap to search a different server/PPA, and a snap store is just a http server, so its easy

                That seems pretty distributed to me!

                From here: http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2016/...store.html?m=1

                The only difference seems to be that snap on Ubuntu has chosen their server as default, whereas flatpak currently has no default, and needs one added by the user

                With love

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                • #18
                  It seems its two commands to get snap to search a different server/PPA, and a snap server is just a webserver, so its easy

                  That seems pretty distributed!

                  From here: http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2016/...store.html?m=1

                  The only difference seems to be that Ubuntu have configured snap to use a default server, whereas flatpak currently needs this to be set by the user

                  With love

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

                    There is no such a distribution that fits you the best. It is easier to remove/change existing stuff than conjure out of thin air.
                    Arch Linux? The philosophy is brilliant (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...nux#Principles)... Few times i returned back to Windows because the satisfaction factor on most distros is low for me (too high ram usage by default and tons of shit preinstalled(email and contacts applications... Ubuntu Unity: 900 MiB on fresh install, Fedora Gnome same... i even tried other Ubuntu spins like Kubuntu and it was even worse - full of buggs and crashes, always old half-working software put together by hacking the source code and inserting tons of workarounds...)...

                    After i found Arch linux im never looking back and will never install any windows $^%$& on my notebook agin... ram usage on fresh KDE Plasma DE is under 350 MiB and its so fast.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by cen1 View Post
                      Does anybody really care about flatpak and snaps? To me it seems like yet another linux holy war that is reinventing the wheel and not contributing much to the ecosystem. Tell me ONE advatnage over rpm/apt.
                      With rpm/apt, you approach the entire repo as one dependency graph. With e.g. flatpak, you confine your dependency tree to independent runtimes that can be updated asynchronously from the base OS rpm/apt dependency graphs.

                      What this means is that you might not need to update the user-facing flatpaks, but only the base OS rpm/apt dependency graphs and the flatpak runtime that links into the base OS (and you can update the flatpak runtime without affecting the base OS dependency graph).

                      This is a very big deal for ISVs, because it cuts down on their test and support surface, which will potentially lead to more ISVs offering their software for Linux. As an ISV, you could target the hypothetical XYS webdev stack v2.2x or later or the GNOME 3.2x stack or later for you app instead of having to distrubute eleventeen different .rpm/.deb/.ebuild/.tar.xz/.whatever versions for different distros and versions.

                      At least, that's my current understanding of the benefits of flatpaks.

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