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OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 vs. Leap 42.2 vs. Tumbleweed Benchmarks

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  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 vs. Leap 42.2 vs. Tumbleweed Benchmarks

    Phoronix: OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 vs. Leap 42.2 vs. Thumbleweed Benchmarks

    For those curious how openSUSE Leap 42.2, which was released last week, compares performance-wise to Leap 42.1 and the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed, here are some benchmarks today for your viewing pleasure. Also included with this openSUSE performance comparison was Intel's Clear Linux distribution as an independent metric of a distribution that's generally among the fastest thanks to the aggressive optimizations by default.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=23767

  • #2
    At page 2 the "Parboil v2.5" is correct? Graphic shows 42.1 better than 42.2 but comments says "Parboil results show some more improvements for openSUSE Leap 42.2 over Leap 42.1"

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    • #3
      opensuse is the only linux distro able to take benefit from the opengl CORE PROFILE instead of the compliant profile from my video card. The reason why the others cannot, is a mystery.

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      • #4
        Soon I test fedora to verify if it implements core profile too.

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        • #5
          The first time I bought a copy of SuSE was SuSE Linux 6.0 in 1998. At the time I was impressed by the high quality of this Linux distro compared to the others available at the time (Debian, Redhat, Slackware).

          The same is true even today. I still find it to be one of the most polished and functional distros out there. If I had to give a co-worker or family member Linux, and they have never used it before it would be OpenSuSE. My only gripe with SuSE currently is their use of btrfs.

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          • #6
            I'm curious how targeting the machine's architecture (-march=native -mtune=native) affects the results of numerical/scientific results -- Himeno, Parboil, Dolfyn. Well-designed CFD codes can show near factor-of-2 performance increments by going from the SSE4.2 instruction set to the AVX2 set; how does this interact with the choice of OS-version?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by k1e0x View Post
              The same is true even today. I still find it to be one of the most polished and functional distros out there. If I had to give a co-worker or family member Linux, and they have never used it before it would be OpenSuSE. My only gripe with SuSE currently is their use of btrfs.
              I don't have such a gripe. Snapper is amazing. Sure, you need to know when to use it and when not to use it, but it's extremely useful. Hell, I found a bug in the wireless drivers and could reset back to the pre-regression state on my friend's computer because of it just two days ago.

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              • #8
                Mixed feelings with OpenSuse. I used to run Tumbleweed and in a matter of days I managed to break KDE theming somehow (menus became so transparent they were invisible). I liked the idea of Zypper but it opens new windows like crazy while doing it's stuff, not pleasant to the eye. It works tho. Finding some less common packages was not that easy either even on OBS. You'd usually find a package for Leap but not Tumbleweed and those worked 50% of the time.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                  I don't have such a gripe. Snapper is amazing. Sure, you need to know when to use it and when not to use it, but it's extremely useful. Hell, I found a bug in the wireless drivers and could reset back to the pre-regression state on my friend's computer because of it just two days ago.
                  He probably means that its installer cannot create a btrfs RAID1 (you must install on a single btrfs partition then manually expand later or make a partition beforehand), or the weird fact that it keeps / on btrfs but /home on xfs by default.

                  Neither is a horribly bad issue, mind me.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cen1 View Post
                    Mixed feelings with OpenSuse. I used to run Tumbleweed and in a matter of days I managed to break KDE theming somehow (menus became so transparent they were invisible).
                    Never seen that happen, but if it was early Plasma 5, then I can believe it.

                    Originally posted by cen1 View Post
                    I liked the idea of Zypper but it opens new windows like crazy while doing it's stuff, not pleasant to the eye. It works tho.
                    Uh. Zypper is a command-line program. It can't open windows by definition.

                    And neither does YaST.

                    Originally posted by cen1 View Post
                    Finding some less common packages was not that easy either even on OBS. You'd usually find a package for Leap but not Tumbleweed and those worked 50% of the time.
                    That might be due to the former confusion between Factory and Tumbleweed. There's still some of that laft, actually. Basically, Factory is "Tumbleweed next snapshot" whereas Tumbleweed is "Tumbleweed current snapshot". If you can't find a package for the latter, you can usually find and use a package for the former. It is sometimes under "Other/unsupported distributions" in OBS.

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