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Canonical Rolls Out Its Own Kernel Livepatching Service For Ubuntu

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  • Canonical Rolls Out Its Own Kernel Livepatching Service For Ubuntu

    Phoronix: Canonical Rolls Out Its Own Kernel Livepatching Service For Ubuntu

    Canonically has formally moved forward with its enterprise kernel livepatching service, which it's making free to the Ubuntu community -- assuming you have three Ubuntu installations or less. Like the other approaches, this is about applying in real-time critical security fixes to the kernel without rebooting...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...epatch-Service

  • #2
    Ubuntu Kernel

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    • #3
      Ironically Ubuntu is supposed to mean humanity towards others... yeah right! Why are people using this stuff anyway? Debian is right there and it works great!

      http://www.dirtcellar.net

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      • #4
        Fenully Canonical being able to monetize on something without screwing user freedom!

        Maybe its not going to be a super remunerating biz, but will serve the purpose of reminding people that free software should remain free, not gratis.

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        • #5
          Upstart... Mir... Unity... Only natural this was next after Red Hat started kpatch.

          ​​​​

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          • #6
            Originally posted by waxhead View Post
            Ironically Ubuntu is supposed to mean humanity towards others... yeah right!
            Well, it's not like most users really have a server farm at home and can never reboot their systems. 3 supported installations per user is OK for a company-oriented feature like rebootless kernel patching.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cape View Post
              Fenully Canonical being able to monetize on something without screwing user freedom!
              Yeah, it seems lately they did realize that the most $$$ for linux is in server stuff, and seem to be following the usual suspects (RedHat and SUSE).

              If they keep it up they might stop losing money within this decade.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Well, it's not like most users really have a server farm at home and can never reboot their systems. 3 supported installations per user is OK for a company-oriented feature like rebootless kernel patching.
                Of course, but this is against the way Linux and GNU progress through collaboration , not lock in/out.

                http://www.dirtcellar.net

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by waxhead View Post
                  Of course, but this is against the way Linux and GNU progress through collaboration , not lock in/out.
                  RedHat isn't providing patches for kpatch (on their kernels) if you don't have a RHEL with the right support contract, dunno about SUSE but I think it's the same.

                  The mechanism to patch the kernel is open and available for all (the usual CLA applies), it's the live kernel patches that are linked to a subscription/contract/whatever.

                  I'd say it is OK, as that's a service, you can't expect them to provide services for free in the name of opensource.

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                  • #10
                    If you compare Ubuntu 12$ price with RH and Suse with thousands in support contracts per node, then Ubuntu is clearly a winner.

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