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Developers Are Trying To Make Sure Qt Apps Fit In Well On Fedora Workstation

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  • Developers Are Trying To Make Sure Qt Apps Fit In Well On Fedora Workstation

    Phoronix: Developers Are Trying To Make Sure Qt Apps Fit In Well On Fedora Workstation

    Fedora developers are trying to ensure that Qt applications still integrate well with the Fedora Workstation desktop, which is powered by GNOME with the GTK tool-kit...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ra-Workstation

  • #2
    I consider this a waste of developer effort.

    Applications and programs are used because they have functionality that is required by users, not because they 'look great' on certain environments. Who seriously gives a rat's ass whether Firefox looks out-of-place in KDE or if VLC looks different in Gnome.

    Shallow people who care about how a piece of software should look are better off in Windows or OS X.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
      I consider this a waste of developer effort.

      Applications and programs are used because they have functionality that is required by users, not because they 'look great' on certain environments. Who seriously gives a rat's ass whether Firefox looks out-of-place in KDE or if VLC looks different in Gnome.

      Shallow people who care about how a piece of software should look are better off in Windows or OS X.
      From a design and user experience standpoint its very important - having menus behave and look differently depending on if it's a GTK or Qt app is wrong and the developers are fixing it

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Griffin View Post
        The few Qt apps of interest to Fedora users should move to the better design as well.
        I see it exactly the other way around!

        Following the past announcements on all major Linux related news sites, we learned, that a lot of former GTK+ based programs moved towards Qt (Wireshark, LxDE and many more). Even Chrome dropped GTK+ support in favour of their own toolkit.

        What most distributions ship are programs that still depend on GTK 1 (xmms for example), GTK 2 (plenty of other programs and wide and commonly used desktop environments) and a handful of GTK 3 programs (basicly to fit into GNOME 3). So rather than fiddling around to make everything look and feel like GTK (and even here with all the limits of unsupported design elements in GTK 2 and GTK 1), it would make more sense to focus on making GTK fit more into Qt. Needless to mention that GTK 3 is totally confusing with all the split up menu elements (like the menu entries that show up in gnome shell, then special buttons embedded into the window decoration and so on).

        A lot of the old stuff isn't even ported to GTK 3 (which exists for a bunch of years now) because developer don't see a need for it or simply lost interest or switched to Qt.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Griffin View Post
          Lxqt, wireshark, that diver app and the shareware-like gcompris are perfect examples of software that never mattered to the majority.
          Simply go out and count the fragmentation of GTK apps,

          Anyways - regardless what toolkit a program uses - if you value the importance of a program towards the toolkit it uses then you simply don't seem have any real life problems to deal with.

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          • #6
            I like Gtk, but its not hard to think of a reason for why you would rather use Qt for some applications: Qt is better suited for cross platform applications. (I know from experience that it is easier to build a Qt application on Windows and let it look and behave as a native Windows application than to do the same for a Gtk one.)

            Qt applications look work alright in a Gtk environment, but integration can definitely be improved. (I hope that they don't focus on Adwaita to much, though.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
              Applications and programs are used because they have functionality that is required by users, not because they 'look great' on certain environments. Who seriously gives a rat's ass whether Firefox looks out-of-place in KDE or if VLC looks different in Gnome.

              This didn't come through very well, but a QPlatformTheme plugin can not only provide visual integration, but also platform native dialogs, menus (e.g. global menu bars), systemtray/notification area integration and so on.

              KDE also provides such an integration plugin.

              Cheers,
              _

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Griffin View Post
                I agree tools doesn't matter. What matters are freedom, user experience, design and security. GTK enables the developers to deliver products that fullfill the requirements. I can perfectly understand why Fedora tries to shoehorn some of stale Qt apps into a better world.
                I'm interested to know how Qt is somehow deficient in those aspects. Also, trying to enforce "user experience" at the toolkit level is never a good idea, which fortunately is something that GTK doesn’t do right now.

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                • #9
                  Is history repeating itself? This is bluecurve all over again...
                  Wasn't Qt already able to use native gtk widgets when drawing windows? (Like they do on OSX and windows)?

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                  • #10
                    How about unified file dialogs? No? Nothing useful happening then. Qt already does a pretty good job looking as GTK. Time better spent elsewhere imho..

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