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Fedora 24 Slated To Receive Default Local DNS Resolver & Node.js 4.2

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  • Fedora 24 Slated To Receive Default Local DNS Resolver & Node.js 4.2

    Phoronix: Fedora 24 Slated To Receive Default Local DNS Resolver & Node.js 4.2

    There's just over one month to go until the change checkpoint for Fedora 24. New features continue to be proposed...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Linux-Node-DNS

  • #2
    Hmm, does this mean Fedora would be able to resolve DNS by itself instead of relying on another DNS server like Google or your ISP's?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post
      Hmm, does this mean Fedora would be able to resolve DNS by itself instead of relying on another DNS server like Google or your ISP's?
      No, all DNS servers rely on a higher DNS server excluding the root ones. For example when Google's DNS recives a request for phoronix.com it will ask one of the root DNS server for the IP of phoronix.com, it will then store that in cache. If somebody else asks for phoronix.com then Google's DNS can provide it without asking the root DNS server.

      With this your computer would locally cache DNS records for a specific period of time (say 1 day), so if you request phoronix.com your computer will ask your DNS provider (Google's or your ISP's) but then next time you request phoronix.com your computer would be able to instantly provide the responce without requesting it from your DNS provider.

      So if I request phoronix.com right now I get:

      Code:
      ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> phoronix.com
      ;; global options: +cmd
      ;; Got answer:
      ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 60112
      ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0
      
      ;; QUESTION SECTION:
      ;phoronix.com.            IN    A
      
      ;; ANSWER SECTION:
      phoronix.com.        86013    IN    A    69.46.29.30
      
      ;; Query time: 0 msec
      ;; SERVER: 127.0.0.1#53(127.0.0.1)
      ;; WHEN: Wed Dec  2 19:45:55 2015
      ;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 46
      This is good for performance and privacy.
      Last edited by Spazturtle; 12-03-2015, 01:26 AM. Reason: changed "example.com" to "phoronix.com"

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      • #4
        I switched NetworkManager to dnsmasq mode on Fedora 22 a short time ago to get split DNS when connecting to a VPN at work. It all works like magic! On my Gentoo machine at home, I don't use NetworkManager so I have dnsmasq configured to do this statically but it's just as good in practise.

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        • #5
          So, how do I setup the same on my Arch machine? Enforcing DNSSEC would be really useful in a lot of situations...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
            So, how do I setup the same on my Arch machine? Enforcing DNSSEC would be really useful in a lot of situations...
            https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Unbound

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            • #7
              This is a development I have been waiting to see. Local DNS servers, not quite there yet but it would be very nice if this eventually leads to obsoleting external DNS servers for the most part. The current system though of first requesting the address from an external DNS server then after that resolving it locally is a wonderful first step.

              It would be nice if it were to become a standard for operating systems to ship with an internal DNS Resolver. We might be a long way from that, but faster and safer internet.
              Last edited by rabcor; 12-03-2015, 07:51 AM.

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              • #8
                How does this tie together with DNSCrypt? I use DNSCrypt at the moment, but I don't understand really if the Local DNS resolver is a drop in replacement for DNSCrypt or if I will still have to use both?

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