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Ubuntu Finally Looks To Go With Persistent Network Interface Names

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Ericg View Post

    The bigger pain is when you have network interfaces switching themselves around during boot. Its the same reason why we stopped using /dev/sda /dev/sdb /dev/sdc in /fstab. If the kernel probes in them in a different order on the next boot then /dev/sdb could wind up as /dev/sda and you get a nonbooting system. The only way network interface names will change under the new system is if you physically move them into different slots.

    Also, yes, considering this got pushed originally by RHEL I promise you that they considered several scenarios that server admins find themselves in... its kind of their job.
    it's an issue, that has been solved ~ 10 years ago, iirc. on some distros (EDIT: including ubuntu), we have (autogenerated) persistent udev rule (details, details.. yea), ifnames tied to mac address and so, in past xx years, the only way I could get an ifname change was NOT to move to another pci/e slot, but to delete that autogenerated udev rule (or modify it)

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Ericg View Post

      Not denying your experience, but its not just Ubuntu Server who does this... You also get it on RHEL and RHEL-clones, SUSE, possibly soon Debian, as well as any distro who uses a recent version of udev. You can disable it, or just make udev rules where you manually name them, but by default you're gonna get it eventually unless you move to *BSD.
      I perfectly understant that lot of people would need this feature, no arguing here. it's just the naming schema thats nonsense, imo. and yep, I'll "fix" it myself immediately when it comes to my favourite distro

      EDIT: as said, it fixes a nonexistent problem, sane distros fixed the problem long time ago. I see this "fix" (especialy in ubuntu/debian derivatives. cant speak of rhel, long time no use here.) as "for sake of change", nothing more, nothing less. damn. too much EDITs for today
      Last edited by stefansaraev; 11 May 2015, 02:16 PM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by david_lynch View Post
        What a pain for server administrators. I wonder if these folks ever thought about how many boxes are out there running scripts that start out like this:


        for i in `ifconfig -a | grep eth`
        They are not forcing you to use the new names. Just use the classic names.

        Edit: Seems you have to configure it though. I first though both would be available at the same time.
        Last edited by carewolf; 11 May 2015, 02:53 PM.

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        • #14
          I can't believe what i just have read.\
          Finally, many distributions support renaming interfaces to user-chosen names (think: "internet0", "dmz0", ...) keyed off their MAC addresses or physical locations as part of their networking scripts. This is a very good choice but does have the problem that it implies that the user is willing and capable of choosing and assigning these names.
          How in first place this user is willing and capable to turn on it's computer is the actual question!!!!

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          • #15
            there was a competition on reddit
            http://www.reddit.com/r/linux/commen...e_assignments/

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            • #16
              Originally posted by stefansaraev View Post
              I perfectly understant that lot of people would need this feature, no arguing here. it's just the naming schema thats nonsense, imo. and yep, I'll "fix" it myself immediately when it comes to my favourite distro

              EDIT: as said, it fixes a nonexistent problem, sane distros fixed the problem long time ago. I see this "fix" (especialy in ubuntu/debian derivatives. cant speak of rhel, long time no use here.) as "for sake of change", nothing more, nothing less. damn. too much EDITs for today
              That solution does not work for first-boot or with read-only /etc. Both important cases for both modern server (with VMs, containers) and embedded devices scenarios.

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              • #17
                the only case where regular udev persistent name rules don't work is if something opens the device before udev renames it, so really early in the boot process

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by stefansaraev View Post

                  it's an issue, that has been solved ~ 10 years ago, iirc. on some distros (EDIT: including ubuntu), we have (autogenerated) persistent udev rule (details, details.. yea), ifnames tied to mac address and so, in past xx years, the only way I could get an ifname change was NOT to move to another pci/e slot, but to delete that autogenerated udev rule (or modify it)
                  That's the same thing I was thinking. I have a /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules that does its jobs wonderfully, so what "persistence" are we talking about?

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                  • #19
                    it's something dell came up with so interface names would match the physical ports
                    not a bad thing for servers really, i just wish they choose a better naming convention

                    bdw http://linux.dell.com/files/whitepap...g_in_linux.pdf
                    Last edited by gens; 11 May 2015, 07:37 PM.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
                      These names can become pretty wild, if you have something like a USB wifi/ethernet adapter. I have wlp0s11f1u1 here.
                      What a cluster-f. As soon as I saw "Fedora" in the sub-headline I knew it would be a cluster-f solution.

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