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Select Ubuntu Versions Are Working To Switch To Systemd's Networkd

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  • Select Ubuntu Versions Are Working To Switch To Systemd's Networkd

    Phoronix: Select Ubuntu Versions Are Working To Switch To Systemd's Networkd

    While Ubuntu 15.04 marked the point of switching from Upstart to systemd, Ubuntu Linux doesn't currently make use of all systemd functionality, such as networkd. However, at least for networkd, that soon could be changing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...etworkd-Ubuntu

  • #2
    vt

    When is the in-kernel virtual terminal ever going to be replaced with a userspace virtual terminal?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      When is the in-kernel virtual terminal ever going to be replaced with a userspace virtual terminal?
      As far as I know systemd-console can be enabled as a compile flags since one or two versions.

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      • #4
        I'm using networkd for my home compute server, and yea, it's certainly quite nice if all you need is DHCP. And bridging, although for some reason it would get stuck configuring things when I tried to get it working with hostapd...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
          I'm using networkd for my home compute server, and yea, it's certainly quite nice if all you need is DHCP. And bridging, although for some reason it would get stuck configuring things when I tried to get it working with hostapd...
          How often does your server network config changes? Mine has been the same for years, reboots happen maybe once a month. Router does most of the job. Why do I need networkd or systemd in general?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Stellarwind View Post
            How often does your server network config changes? Mine has been the same for years, reboots happen maybe once a month. Router does most of the job. Why do I need networkd or systemd in general?
            Basically you set up a server and then it just runs. Most of the work after that is maintenance. Patching, upgrading application software, minor config changes for new requirements, etc. Making whole sale changes to servers tends to be too disruptive due to interrupting the services that they supply

            I don't think systemd and friends are very useful for servers. To be perfectly frank they seem to solve the wrong problems i.e things that are actually easy if you know what you're doing.

            While it's not a popular opinion if you don't know what you're doing then you stay off a server. The number of stupid things that software developers do to them gives me great pause for thought about how a good idea it is to lower the barrier to entry.

            I suspect that systemd will do one of two things. One is not much, in which case it's kind of pointless. Two is allow people with a little knowledge to royally mess things up. I'm afraid I'm not optimistic that it's going to improve things.

            Docker has far more scope for allowing things to improve (security, stability, efficiency, etc) than systemd ever will. And yes you can mess things up using docker but that underlines my point of knowing what you're doing.

            In the real world if you mess about with engines and don't know what you're doing you can break them. If it's electricity then it can be short circuits or electrocution. Etc, etc.

            But hey maybe I'm wrong and using unit files instead of config files is going to make everything better.

            But then I'm just a long time Solaris and Linux system administrator so what do I know. ;-)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Stellarwind View Post
              How often does your server network config changes? Mine has been the same for years, reboots happen maybe once a month. Router does most of the job. Why do I need networkd or systemd in general?
              Static server usecases are usually easy.

              networkd is needed for dynamic use cases... Laptops, mobile, VPNs and maybe even things like containers. Existing systems are distro-specific and rely on scripts that are frankly quite messy and fragile, so if networkd can bring some improvement in this area, I'm all for it.

              That said, at least currently networkd doesn't support everything the existing scripts do; One thing that personally affects me is that openvswitch support seems to be missing, and while support for it with eg. Fedora's existing network-scripts -infrastructure for openvswitch isn't stellar, it at least exists.

              As to why you'd need systemd in general... well, I guess you *don't*, in many cases, but I'll certainly be happy if I never again have to write or debug an init script.

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              • #8
                Well the complexity has been moved out of the init script which you can debug into systemd which you can't. As a system administrator that is a bad thing. It's good for Redhat though as it'll help get them more hellishly expensive (lucrative) support contacts.

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