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Fenrus Linux: A Distro For Performance, Developers

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  • #51
    Originally posted by Pallidus View Post
    hey fenrus will this remain your pet project or would you actually consider forming a small community and bring in more devs ?
    I'd love to get others to help out. Having said that, I don't quite know how that is going to work yet... I have a load of documentation to write on how to use, and then how to contribute, before that becomes realistic.
    (and writing docs isn't as interesting as integrating, say, gnome 3.8 as I was doing last night)

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    • #52
      Originally posted by ryao View Post
      This sounds sane to me. The sunspider benchmark does the same thing.
      I find curious that you cite this one, when Apple has recently removed a claim from its website that they had "the world's fastest web browser", whereas Google showed that the results of this benchmark are misleading, and Mozilla developers are now claiming that benchmarks such as Sunspider "suck".

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      • #53
        Originally posted by fenrus View Post
        Now I think you're confused. The average of "half as fast" and "twice as fast" is not "neutral" in any math that I can think of (before my morning coffee at least)
        Ok, I will wait you take your coffee and will explain this to you latter.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by juanrga View Post
          Ok, I will wait you take your coffee and will explain this to you latter.
          Well, you could always do it in log scale.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by fenrus View Post
            Now I think you're confused. The average of "half as fast" and "twice as fast" is not "neutral" in any math that I can think of (before my morning coffee at least)
            The average of 2 and 1/2 cannot be zero, because negative values are being excluded from that range. But negative values can be allowed. They are in my previous +-100 point example, which averages to zero ("neutral"). Your graphs also allow for negative values, but in a non-neutral way, giving a false impression of performance.

            Consider this other example: three cities A, B, and C, whose distance between cities A and B is the same than between cities B and C. A red car travels at 40 km/h from city A to city B and at 20 km/h from city B to city C. Whereas a blue car travels at 20 km/h from city A to city B and at 40 km/h from city B to city C. What car is faster?

            Using a methodology as yours, the red car is 100% faster than the blue car in the first span and -50% ("half as fast") in the second span. The average being 25% faster, which is not true.
            Last edited by juanrga; 03-27-2013, 06:41 PM.

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