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Alan Cox Calls Fedora 18 "The Worst Red Hat Distro"

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  • lsatenstein
    replied
    Only one logon is wrong

    [QUOTE=LinuxID10T;308027]Or it is just standard security and you want processes to run in the background (such as in a server environment.) Also, it doesn't appear when you install another desktop environment, that is how I found this out, so wrong on both counts.[/QUOTEOnly

    I have a netbook and I run Fedora. With only one logon, the only option left is suspend. On a return from suspend, the mouse pad no longer works. I have not figured out a way to revert from suspend to a fully operating system. Two users allows me to logout and to return without having to reboot. BTW, when I need to type the Euro symbol, I have to quit gnome and return with KDE (Keyboard is Canadian French)

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  • lsatenstein
    replied
    Lack of Quality Control

    Acually, There is a very good quality control process. What is lacking is having programmers respond to the filed bugs listed in bugzilla. There is no acknowledgement.

    Once a week I visit bugzilla and search for mybugs, and the list has no action. I cannot consider refiling from F18 to Rawhide, but Perhaps Rawhide buglist should include the F18 buglist.

    If not a bug, close it. But be proactive and fix the bug or respond asking for more information.

    Leave a comment:


  • LinuxID10T
    replied
    Originally posted by BO$$ View Post
    I'm thinking microsoft could benefit from this move: Linux - the operating system even its main developers and promoters tire of. If they were smart they could start a whole campaign against linux by reading these threads. Luckily they won't since the campaign would probably attract more attention to linux than it ever had.

    Linux - the desktop OS in which you have the power of the smartphone (and a picture with Gnome 3).
    Linux - ever felt like going back to the 80s when the cmd line was still in high regard.
    Linux - no UI consistency, just freedom.
    Linux - let's make; make install friends!
    Linux - no games, just work!
    Ubuntu - the new amazon search!
    Fedora 18 - it's great, if you can pass the anaconda!
    Ubuntu - we release every 6 months! We just can't get the damn thing right.
    Fedora 18 - no QA! It just works(*) -> (*)We can't guarantee that but it does work on my mother's computer! I swear! There are billions of hardware combinations so why try? It's futile.
    Linux - where old bugs are treated with respect and not fixed!
    Best thing... EVAR!!!

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  • squirrl
    replied
    Really doesn't matter

    So ESR ended up taking the Ubuntu challenge and here comes the rest

    Wonder how long it took them to adopt Slackware back in the 1990s?

    Leave a comment:


  • Panix
    replied
    Originally posted by AdamW View Post
    It does always amaze me how people are happy to download an entire *computer operating system* and throw it at their computer - with valuable data on it! - without even reading the damn documentation.

    For Pete's sake people, it's an operating system, not a new version of Angry Birds. You might want to read something about it before hitting the big red button. The F18 release documentation is pretty clear on the fact that the new installer UI is a first cut and still has rough edges:
    Then don't release it!!! How difficult is that?!? "Spherical Cow?!?" LOL! I agree with the other poster: what is wrong with you guys?!?

    Post #8 hit the nail on the head. The neglect of Quality Control is one of the negative aspects in the Linux world. Everyone tells someone else to file bugs but people don't or when they do, they are ignored or the process is just sadly slow or unorganized. This is just one of the drawbacks of the free system but perhaps, they need to address the problem instead of releasing all these new projects at such a pace?

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  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    gksudo nautilus
    Indeed. In KDE, you simply have to enter "dolphin" or "superuser" and it even gives a graphical icon that opens it with root permissions. Or K -> System -> File manager -> File manager - superuser mode. It's much, much simpler, faster and easier than logging in as root.

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  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by lsatenstein View Post
    b) Gui mode is used to allow me to manage files and directories without the problems arising from a keying in error.
    gksudo nautilus

    Leave a comment:


  • lsatenstein
    replied
    Originally posted by AdamW View Post
    Leslie, please don't recommend people log in graphically as root. It is highly insecure and not to be advised in any case for any reason. Fedora is not designed to encourage this.
    ===
    Please enumerate how logging in as root in GUI mode is more dangerous than using command line when.
    a) Yum is not executed, nor any internet access
    b) Gui mode is used to allow me to manage files and directories without the problems arising from a keying in error.
    c) Want a list of key-in errors, just look at typos, look at rm *~ vs rm * ~
    d) moving files from ../.././abc.c /opt/country/province/state/client/src and doing a mark and paste

    So, please tell me what I am overlooking to make logging in as root more dangerous.
    For years I have modifed pam.d files to allow root to logon in aui environment. So far, no past history of attacks as external web access is not used, and I am confident that no gui file or bash, bashrc etc has been modified.

    I use common sense. Does that not exist any more.

    I await your one example that will change my work habits.

    I am not stubborn to reject changing my ways of doing things. I just would like one justification.

    Leave a comment:


  • yogi_berra
    replied
    Originally posted by JanC View Post
    That is not why sudo was invented; it was "invented" to allow certain users to run certain applications (with certain options) as root (or as a certain user) without (necessarily) needing the root password (or the password of that certain user).

    Additionally, it also logs every invocation.
    Not quite. It was written because gnu su will never limit users from root access because someone decided RMS didn't need root access at MIT (he probably didn't) and it scarred him for life.

    Sometimes a few of the users try to hold total power over all the rest. For example, in 1984, a few users at the MIT AI lab decided to seize power by changing the operator password on the Twenex system and keeping it secret from everyone else. (I was able to thwart this coup and give power back to the users by patching the kernel, but I wouldn't know how to do that in Unix.)

    However, occasionally the rulers do tell someone. Under the usual su mechanism, once someone learns the root password who sympathizes with the ordinary users, he or she can tell the rest. The ?wheel group? feature would make this impossible, and thus cement the power of the rulers.

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  • JanC
    replied
    Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
    I remember sudo being 'invented' for people who have difficulty remembering that they are going to do something as root.
    That is not why sudo was invented; it was "invented" to allow certain users to run certain applications (with certain options) as root (or as a certain user) without (necessarily) needing the root password (or the password of that certain user).

    Additionally, it also logs every invocation.
    Last edited by JanC; 01-25-2013, 04:26 PM.

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