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SprezzOS: "Most Robust, Beautiful & Performant Linux"

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  • SprezzOS: "Most Robust, Beautiful & Performant Linux"

    Phoronix: SprezzOS: "Most Robust, Beautiful & Performant Linux"

    Developers behind a new Linux distribution set to be released in the coming days claim that their SprezzOS operating system is "the most robust, beautiful, and high-performance Linux ever to be distributed." Here's some details on this new Linux distribution...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI2OTM

  • j2723
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Debian stable comes with software much older than what you get on Windows. Windows is *not* a software distribution. You get the latest versions of all your software from the vendor of that software. On Debian (and of course virtually any other Linux distro) you get the software from Debian (or repo from the distro you're using.)
    I was going to write something similar to that, but you beat me to it.

    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    Have you been using the experimental, unstable, bleeding edge version of Windows? Or the stable, released, and supported version.
    ...

    You can still backport select applications that NEED to be more current (I do this with firefox), but you don't need to upgrade your bootloader, compiler, C library and shell every week. If you want a stable product, you must let it stabilise instead of throwing untested stuff into the mix for fun.

    Some people misunderstand: Debian unstable, Fedora, Ubuntu etc. are not meant to be stable. They are meant to be unstable. If you run them, you must accept this. They are sanitized snapshots with modern software. The stable releases are the long-term support releases, and they ARE stable.
    Yes, I have been using the latest and greatest software on Windows, but not the testing/unstable equivalent of the underlying system (the actual "Windows software"), which you are referring to.
    The problem is that there is no easy/hassle-free way to do that on GNU/Linux. Either you use something like backports, which doesn't even have all the packages you need, or you compile all your software from source.

    There isn't a good way to install software on a per-user basis either...
    It's either system-wide or back to compiling from source.

    Preferrably, all my software would be up-to-date while the underlying system (grub/bootloader, initd/systemd, xserver, admin tools, audioserver, desktop manager, etc.) can be as stable and old as hell.

    I guess I want to have, and eat my cake at the same time .

    I'm open to any suggestions.

    Originally posted by nightmarex View Post
    I have used Windows since before it was windows. I have had Windows do neat things to MBR's trust me. Of course to suffer threw the hell fuck that is Windows, it may have caused memory loss.
    Well, I meant in relation to using GNU/Linux . I have been using Windows OS' from 95 (good 'ol BSOD, hah) up until Windows 7, I don't plan buying 8 or even trying it.
    Last edited by j2723; 01-12-2013, 01:22 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    Not older than Windows, surely!!!
    Debian stable comes with software much older than what you get on Windows. Windows is *not* a software distribution. You get the latest versions of all your software from the vendor of that software. On Debian (and of course virtually any other Linux distro) you get the software from Debian (or repo from the distro you're using.)

    Leave a comment:


  • nightmarex
    replied
    Originally posted by j2723 View Post
    The point is, these things shouldn't happen, ever.
    I have been using Windows in the past for so long, and I don't remember a single time where my bootloader (or windows update software) got crapped because of a system update.
    I'd also like to mention, I've been using Windows for far longer than I have been using any GNU/Linux distributions.
    I'm not exactly "new" to GNU/Linux either, I've been using it exclusively as my Desktop for well over a year now, and around two years as a Server.
    I have used Windows since before it was windows. I have had Windows do neat things to MBR's trust me. Of course to suffer threw the hell fuck that is Windows, it may have caused memory loss.

    Leave a comment:


  • pingufunkybeat
    replied
    Originally posted by j2723 View Post
    The point is, these things shouldn't happen, ever.
    I have been using Windows in the past for so long, and I don't remember a single time where my bootloader (or windows update software) got crapped because of a system update.
    I'd also like to mention, I've been using Windows for far longer than I have been using any GNU/Linux distributions.
    Have you been using the experimental, unstable, bleeding edge version of Windows? Or the stable, released, and supported version.

    If you want to compare, you have to compare Windows releases to the long-term support releases of Linux: Debian stable, RHEL, SUSE Linux Enterprise, Ubuntu LTS or CentOS.

    I know you will probably argue that I should use Debian stable, but that wont cut it for me.
    Debian stable - too old software.
    Not older than Windows, surely!!!

    You can still backport select applications that NEED to be more current (I do this with firefox), but you don't need to upgrade your bootloader, compiler, C library and shell every week. If you want a stable product, you must let it stabilise instead of throwing untested stuff into the mix for fun.

    Some people misunderstand: Debian unstable, Fedora, Ubuntu etc. are not meant to be stable. They are meant to be unstable. If you run them, you must accept this. They are sanitized snapshots with modern software. The stable releases are the long-term support releases, and they ARE stable.

    Leave a comment:


  • j2723
    replied
    Originally posted by Calinou View Post
    Updates never broke a system for me (except on Arch).
    Well, I mainly run Debian testing, sometimes I do run unstable.
    Some examples what has happened to me in the past:
    there was an update for grub, update went wrong and couldn't boot.
    there was an update for gpg keys (not sure what it was, but had something to do with gpg keys), and apt was refusing to install/remove/update anything.

    The point is, these things shouldn't happen, ever.
    I have been using Windows in the past for so long, and I don't remember a single time where my bootloader (or windows update software) got crapped because of a system update.
    I'd also like to mention, I've been using Windows for far longer than I have been using any GNU/Linux distributions.
    I'm not exactly "new" to GNU/Linux either, I've been using it exclusively as my Desktop for well over a year now, and around two years as a Server.

    I know you will probably argue that I should use Debian stable, but that wont cut it for me.
    Debian stable - too old software.
    Debian stable with backports - too much hassle.
    Debian testing (using it as we speak) - pretty good, some packages stay buggy for a long time though.
    Debian unstable - also pretty good, but updates break packages more frequently.

    I think the design of the package managers on GNU/Linux systems is the main problem here (at least with apt and yum).

    One thing that bothers me most, is not being able to install multiple versions of the same software using the package manager.
    Yes, I could compile it from source (which I do now and then), but that just proves that the package manager has a flaw, if you have to work around the problem.

    One promising package manager seems to be Nix, you can install multiple versions of software, undo any updates/etc. . It's purely functional, that means, it wont ever modify existing packages, new packages and old packages live side-by-side.
    NixOS is a distribution that uses the Nix package manager, but I don't think it's ready for everyday use just yet.

    One more thing I'd like to add, I wouldn't be using GNU/Linux if I wouldn't like it , it just has some flaws that need fixing (for Desktops, at least).

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by ElderSnake View Post
    This is Phoronix Forums, it's basically unwritten law that everyone hates on everyone and everything
    Note that this is like Moore's law -- an observation not a rule. You don't *have* to hate on everything, it just happens a lot right now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trinitronic
    replied
    Originally posted by ElderSnake View Post
    This is Phoronix Forums, it's basically unwritten law that everyone hates on everyone and everything
    Yea i'm new here, well not totally i follow the site for a year now. just only now i made an account.
    Anyway i will keep that in mind then

    Leave a comment:


  • ElderSnake
    replied
    Originally posted by Trinitronic View Post
    Guys guys, all the complaining when we can use all the help and support for Linux.
    This is Phoronix Forums, it's basically unwritten law that everyone hates on everyone and everything

    Leave a comment:


  • Trinitronic
    replied
    Guys guys, all the complaining when we can use all the help and support for Linux.

    Everone and every company helping in someway should be a good thing.. (ok, unless its Microsoft)

    Leave a comment:

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