Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Arch Linux Is Switching To Systemd

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sabriah
    replied
    Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
    Its change and in neckbeard speak Change is evil. Even if its for the better.
    Neckbeard?! I got it!

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by kayosiii View Post
    I am pretty sure you have your wires crossed on the rt daemon thing since I have been around on the LAD and LAU mailing lists while this has been happening. My understanding goes like this - the method for RT that jack currently uses introduces security issues such that distros such as debian don't want to turn it on by default... The current compromise is that debian based distros at least give you the option to turn it on when you install jack. What Lennart proposed (and implemented) was an alternative method of getting realtime privileges that offered extra security against some forms of attack. He wrote to the linux audio crowd to inform them that an alternative way of getting realtime privileges was available. The jack crowd understandably had previously been told that they way that they were doing things was acceptable and to my knowledge has stuck to the way that they are doing things. I don't think a daemon (other than pulse or jack) is involved in this process at all. -
    Rtkit was the solution lennart came up with, and it does run as a daemon. Apps have to be written to take advantage if it, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by RollMeAway View Post
    I stopped using my installation of Arch when upgrading offered NO OPTION but to install systemd.

    My experience with other distros using systemd is: If it works you don't even know its there.
    If it doesn't work YOU, the user have little control, or knowledge, of how to fix it.

    My view is that systemd is a complicated solution looking for a problem to fix.
    I had NO PROBLEMS with booting, that I could not fix, until systemd came along.

    If you just use the basic install a distro gives you, likely you won't care about systemd.
    Assuming the distro developers can learn how to setup and use systemd.

    If you are a tweaker, and like to change things, systemd has a LONG way to go before it is usable.
    Perhaps in the future 3rd party developers will produce an interface for humans to control systemd.
    Until that time I still have other options. Debian and slackware to name a couple.
    Systemd is easy to use and BACKWARDS COMPATIBLE with sysvinit. Also has spectacular docs.
    Really, if you are a tweaker, systemd is great.
    Also, fast boot is only a small part of what it brings. A much bigger win is that it makes handling services so easy and it manages their lifecycle.

    On a side note, Lennart might want to change his name, or at least act as a ghost coder for someone else. That would get rid of these stupid arguments.

    Leave a comment:


  • 0xCAFE
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisXY View Post
    My systemctl completes fine in zsh.

    sudo systemctl restart post[tab] => sudo systemctl restart postgresql.service

    But it doesn't seem to always work well yet...
    It completes in bash on Fedora as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Awesomeness
    replied
    systemd works fine here. I don't see what the fuss is all about.

    As for being Linux-only: systemd only adapts launchd principles to Linux (which is why software already modified for launchd only required a very small patch for systemd). There was a GSOC project years ago to port launchd to FreeBSD. To support that move Apple even changed launchd's license from the LGPL-like APSL to Apache License 2. The FreeBSD devs, however, decided not to pursue the launchd integration any further which made the whole GSOC project go to waste.
    If BSD users/devs/whoever bitch at systemd being Linux-only, they are the ones to blame for letting launchd on FreeBSD rot.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisXY
    replied
    Originally posted by oliver View Post
    I have only played with systemd for about 5 minutes, but what I 'miss' is what makes /etc/init.d so handy, is that you can use tabtab to help you find available init scripts (on gentoo anyway). With systemd they are all hidden somewhere less easy. I guess it's just some getting used to.
    My systemctl completes fine in zsh.

    sudo systemctl restart post[tab] => sudo systemctl restart postgresql.service

    But it doesn't seem to always work well yet...

    Leave a comment:


  • 0xCAFE
    replied
    Originally posted by oliver View Post
    I have only played with systemd for about 5 minutes, but what I 'miss' is what makes /etc/init.d so handy, is that you can use tabtab to help you find available init scripts (on gentoo anyway). With systemd they are all hidden somewhere less easy. I guess it's just some getting used to.

    All in all however, I found systemd confusing, complex and messy.
    systemd makes most administrative tasks simpler.

    A good read is Lennart's series of blog postings "systemd for Administrators" starting with Part 1.

    Leave a comment:


  • oliver
    replied
    Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
    2.8 Seconds. Case closed. Kernel + Userspace
    http://s7.directupload.net/images/120815/je3nqk7u.png

    Probably could save some time by adding "quiet" to kernel line because console slows boot down.

    I like systemd it's not harder to use systemctl start xy.service than /etc/rc.d/networt start other than that
    in my day to day work I don't encounter any advantages or disadvantages. Kind of miss the old rc.conf though.
    When I set up my PC with the new install scripts I had to look up all the different files and what they contain.
    Most of them don't exist when you set up you pc. A blank rc.conf with LOCALE= HOSTNAME= etc. makes it
    easier to get everything pre configured without having to remember anything.
    I have only played with systemd for about 5 minutes, but what I 'miss' is what makes /etc/init.d so handy, is that you can use tabtab to help you find available init scripts (on gentoo anyway). With systemd they are all hidden somewhere less easy. I guess it's just some getting used to.

    All in all however, I found systemd confusing, complex and messy. In time, I'm sure I'll get used to it


    As for running your PC 24/7, unless it's a server, is just silly. It is very wasteful. I have a laptop, that gets put into standby whenever I don't use it. And my desktop I actually shut off when I don't use. My servers obviously run 24/7

    Leave a comment:


  • vitaly66
    replied
    For a sane, simple, reliable and portable service installation framework, have a look at perp:

    http://b0llix.net/perp/

    Vitaly

    Leave a comment:


  • AJSB
    replied
    Originally posted by bwat47 View Post
    I really hope you are being sarcastic.
    As for systemd , yes, it was a sarcasm....like i said , i never tested it, so have no opinion...the idea of a faster boot, however, is OK.


    ....but NO, i wasn't sarcastic about my PC running Slackware is always ON in 24/7

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X