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Booting Fedora 17 In Less Than Three Seconds

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Booting Fedora 17 In Less Than Three Seconds

    Booting Fedora 17 In Less Than Three Seconds

    Phoronix: Booting Fedora 17 In Less Than Three Seconds

    It's possible to optimize the Fedora 17 boot process to boot the system in less than three seconds. One developer went from a boot time of 15 seconds down to just 2.5 seconds...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTExMDc

  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by Kano View Post
    Also why should prefetch improve ssd bootspeed?
    SSD random seek times are, at best, around 10 microseconds. So, a small, but measurable, number that adds up over the boot process.

    Leave a comment:


  • anonymous
    replied
    I'm most certain that having an SSD would make any OS boot fast. However SSDs are still a new technology (questionable reliability) and not everyone wants or can afford one. Improving the OS's individual boot time would benefit all users.

    Leave a comment:


  • movieman
    replied
    My MythTV backend boots Ubuntu off an SSD; I haven't timed it, but it spends noticeably more time in the BIOS than the OS boot process.

    So I don't see why Linux can't boot fast even without removing lots of services.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
    Why's the written guide being pushed out?

    Integrate these features! They know it's what we want. Why do they keep teasing?
    Because if functionality is being lost, they're not going to make it the default. Rather, they provide documentation, and leave the decision to those who can say for certain that they don't need those things.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
    Without LVM or selinux or software RAID or zeroconf, it's not going to be a "useful" computer in many environments, more like a toy.
    None of those seem particularly important to me, with the possible exception of SELinux. I don't use LVM or RAID on my desktop, and I *certainly* don't use zeroconf. Why would I care about those things on a normal system?

    Leave a comment:


  • devius
    replied
    Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
    Who reboots in the age of suspend and hibernate? Everyone prefers persistent sessions over having to log back in again.
    Holy Exaggerated Generalization Batman! I guess I'm nobody then because I don't suspend and hibernate. I don't like killing trees for no reason. I do agree about the dubious usefulness of such a stripped down system, but that a 3 second boot is interesting yes it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • halfmanhalfamazing
    replied
    Originally posted by Teho View Post
    I would say that it looks more like an normal desktop system instead of server.
    Which is more of what Fedora is about anyways. SElinux and so much of this other stuff should be optional, not mandatory.

    Let those who want it flick it on have at it, instead of the other way around. It doesn't need to be removed, just disabled by default.

    Leave a comment:


  • halfmanhalfamazing
    replied
    Written guide: waste of time

    Why's the written guide being pushed out?

    Integrate these features! They know it's what we want. Why do they keep teasing?

    For how many generations now has Fedora been talking about fast boot?

    Leave a comment:


  • Teho
    replied
    Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
    Without LVM or selinux or software RAID or zeroconf, it's not going to be a "useful" computer in many environments, more like a toy.
    I would say that it looks more like an normal desktop system instead of server.

    Originally posted by frantaylor View Post
    Who reboots in the age of suspend and hibernate? Everyone prefers persistent sessions over having to log back in again.
    Suspend uses power and hibernate doesn't even work in many situations. Then you kinda have to reboot when ever you upgrade kernel and in some distros that's like once per week. I personally like to start new sessions just for the sake of it.

    Leave a comment:

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