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  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by siride View Post
    You clearly haven't used Windows since the 90s. USB works fine in Windows, unlike Linux, and NTFS, while it has its faults, does pretty darn well most of the time for the range of loads put on it. The fragmentation issue is overblown (it was mostly a FAT problem, anyway) and I rarely defrag and it's rarely that fragmented when I do, even though I use most of my disk -- which would cause fragmentation on ext3/4 as well. The security mechanism isn't "messed up", you just don't understand it. I'll admit ACLs are more complicated than standard Unix permissions, but if you know what you are doing, you can have a lot more fine-grained control over security than in Unix. Even my mom doesn't get viruses anymore and viruses are still mostly a social engineering problem. You can have all the security in the world, but if people are willing to install whatever the webpage tells them to (and sometimes the sites tell you to turn off security stuff or click through warning boxes!), there's nothing you can do to keep people from getting viruses.
    Oh, I did. USB works instantly on Linux while on Windows I have to wait every time when I plug something. This "does pretty darn well most of the time..." can be said about everything, so it's meaningless. I can say the same even about Ext2. It seems you have no clue about fragmentation. I'd like to hear some explanation why it takes hours to defragment partition? While on Windows usually more than 75% of your data is fragmented on Linux it's usually 1-2%. No, I really mean Windows security mechanism is messed up. Some example:

    http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/new...ows-7s-uac.ars

    It's funny you mentioned ACLs while it's also available on Linux. It seems your Mum uses computer just to play solitairy. The viruses are not social problem (keep in mind I'm not talking about trojans which are just programs you run yourself), but it's a Windows design problem. There's no windows like viruses on Linux and Mac, so it clearly shows it's a design problem. Another proof of this is Windows XP viruses were working on Vista as well, so they probably "keep" design mistakes, because of some compatibility.

    On topic: I'm really sad to see this, but not at all surprised. I can't believe Canonical talked all those years ago about how KDE would be supported as a first class citizen. No surprise. Linux seems to want to make itself irrelevant with crappily designed interfaces and dumbing down and ultimately, making Linux on the desktop a sort of second-rate OS for second-rate netbooks. Going with KDE would represent trying to remain competitive.
    In this case I'm with you. In my opinion they fear Kubuntu will become more popular then Ubuntu and they will loose control over it. Canonical wants tablet market and guess what? KDE which isn't backed by any company is there first. Unity is somehow broken, because it's probably only DE where you can't suspend compositions, so it makes games to work slower. Kubuntu was a part of some of the largest migrations to Linux (like Brazilian schools). I doubt if they switch to Ubuntu now. In my opinion one of the most sane distributions will be Mageia, because it has one year lifetime, it focuses on KDE and will use systemd.

    There's also this:

    http://www.techradar.com/news/softwa...5280?artc_pg=1

    Review of the three most popular Linux desktops and community driven KDE is the winner.
    Last edited by kraftman; 09 February 2012, 06:12 AM.

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  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    Linux windows items are scalable dynamically by the user where in MS-Windows the window items that are designed by a resource editors and are set size at the time of design. Yeah some window items can scale like text boxes and the window's container if flagged. It's natural on Linux window systems to expect scalability where on MS systems you expect static sized windows and their window-items.
    Once again, that isn't really KDE's decision, it has to respect the FDO specifications on the matter. But you can override them if you want in KDE (few other window managers let you do that).

    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    So you're saying I can click once on a file in Dolphin and it will allow me to rename the file as it's displayed, not in a dialogue box. btw I have double click on for exec.
    Up until Dolphin 2 that was not possible because of how the Qt item view was designed, but I think this will be implemented for Dolphin 2 (perhaps in 4.8.1 or 4.8.2, I am not sure).

    Honestly I didn't pay that much attention since I always use single click.

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  • e8hffff
    replied
    Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
    I am not sure what you mean by resizable windows (there are fdo specs that determine whether a window can be resized, but KDE lets you override them if you want), but in-line file renaming has been available as an option in dolphin for a long time, and will be the default in an upcoming release once some of the kinks in dolphin 2 are fixed.
    Linux windows items are scalable dynamically by the user where in MS-Windows the window items that are designed by a resource editors and are set size at the time of design. Yeah some window items can scale like text boxes and the window's container if flagged. It's natural on Linux window systems to expect scalability where on MS systems you expect static sized windows and their window-items.

    So you're saying I can click once on a file in Dolphin and it will allow me to rename the file as it's displayed, not in a dialogue box. btw I have double click on for exec.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    On subject, KDE based Linux is probably the best system to bring people to Linux. The only areas that I found a challenge at the start when I moved over about 5 years ago was in-line file renaming wasn't available in Dolphin, and resizeable windows items. Now I couldn't live without resizeable windows, and the renaming I've learned to live with the short coming.
    I am not sure what you mean by resizable windows (there are fdo specs that determine whether a window can be resized, but KDE lets you override them if you want), but in-line file renaming has been available as an option in dolphin for a long time, and will be the default in an upcoming release once some of the kinks in dolphin 2 are fixed.

    Leave a comment:


  • e8hffff
    replied
    The simple fact for many is when you use Linux you feel like the system is yours. When you use Windows, you feel Microsoft owns the OS, and it shows in everything.

    Example of MS dictating the system...you adjust the file sorting/display-categories and before you know it it's automatically resorted how MS likes it or based on the media saved in the folder, even if you adjust the registry to force the modes.

    On subject, KDE based Linux is probably the best system to bring people to Linux. The only areas that I found a challenge at the start when I moved over about 5 years ago was in-line file renaming wasn't available in Dolphin, and resizeable windows items. Now I couldn't live without resizeable windows, and the renaming I've learned to live with the short coming. Linux has 10 fold improved my productivity over my Windows days.

    I used Linux in the 1990's for a games server and I once installed early Linux on the Atari ST, so I've been there, and done Windows too.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by siride View Post
    Even my mom doesn't get viruses anymore and viruses are still mostly a social engineering problem. You can have all the security in the world, but if people are willing to install whatever the webpage tells them to (and sometimes the sites tell you to turn off security stuff or click through warning boxes!), there's nothing you can do to keep people from getting viruses.
    I'm sorry, but that is bullshit. I know two people with virusscan software who two weeks ago got rootkits on windows 7 without any interaction on their part. Heck, you can get a virus on windows 7 just by visiting a web page with a carefully-constructed sound on it. It is probably less of a problem now than it was, but it is still a serious problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • siride
    replied
    Originally posted by kraftman View Post
    So sad windows is so unprofessional, but if it serves as a development platform for other operating systems then I shouldn't be surprised. Btw. Kubuntu is not going away, so I recommend trolls like Levitsky to go away. There's nothing appealing in Windows 7 except some apps and games. That's all. It has messed up USB support, ntfs that's just insane file system which fragments a lot, messed up security mechanism and dozens of viruses, so it's a fully social desktop.
    You clearly haven't used Windows since the 90s. USB works fine in Windows, unlike Linux, and NTFS, while it has its faults, does pretty darn well most of the time for the range of loads put on it. The fragmentation issue is overblown (it was mostly a FAT problem, anyway) and I rarely defrag and it's rarely that fragmented when I do, even though I use most of my disk -- which would cause fragmentation on ext3/4 as well. The security mechanism isn't "messed up", you just don't understand it. I'll admit ACLs are more complicated than standard Unix permissions, but if you know what you are doing, you can have a lot more fine-grained control over security than in Unix. Even my mom doesn't get viruses anymore and viruses are still mostly a social engineering problem. You can have all the security in the world, but if people are willing to install whatever the webpage tells them to (and sometimes the sites tell you to turn off security stuff or click through warning boxes!), there's nothing you can do to keep people from getting viruses.

    I still like Linux. I have a Gentoo partition that I use on the weekends for fun. It has its pluses, but I wouldn't do any real work on it anymore. Microsoft's development tools and platforms blow away whatever is offered for Linux. Eclipse is close, but it's also available on Windows and works better there anyway.

    On topic: I'm really sad to see this, but not at all surprised. I can't believe Canonical talked all those years ago about how KDE would be supported as a first class citizen. No surprise. Linux seems to want to make itself irrelevant with crappily designed interfaces and dumbing down and ultimately, making Linux on the desktop a sort of second-rate OS for second-rate netbooks. Going with KDE would represent trying to remain competitive.

    Leave a comment:


  • mystique_fusion
    replied
    Mint KDE is good but I really like Chakra. It is a combination of Arch and KDE and it really runs smoothly, miles better than Kubuntu.

    Having Arch as the basis, it is very stable/fast and at the same time very elegant. Check the new appearance:

    http://chakra-project.org/bbs/viewtopic.php?id=6726

    The new release I think is for this Sunday, so no reason for any mourning: KDE has a good number of fresh distros to be supported.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Huh, I never even knew Canonical supported Kubuntu to begin with. So yeah, I don't see how this is an issue at all (not that I used Kubuntu a whole lot, anyway).

    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    I think Canonical is making many good choices, even though users are angry over changes. Canonical is getting ready for their products to be on Tablets, and other devices. To do that they need 'Unity' and the methods to suit a variety of devices. Other Companies and distro makers are missing this direction and could find themselves on an island.
    I'm currently using (read: stuck with; Poulsbo, 'nuff said) Ubuntu with their default Unity, and if it's aimed at tablets, they misfired, a lot. It looks like it would be, but in reality, you can't operate Unity on a tablet well. You can't get any programs to run without a keyboard (unless you pin them, but the panel disappears when you maximise a program anyway), and Onboard is too unresponsive right now to be a good enough virtual keyboard (not to mention that real tablet-oriented DEs should be controlled with minimal need of the keyboard). And the fact that you can't change the DPI is essentially the final nail in the coffin - there is absolutely no way to minimise, restore or close windows without a special pointing device on the default low DPI. So really, at least at this point, XFCE is more suited for tablets than Unity, since it at least is always responsive and has a system menu.

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  • RussianNeuroMancer
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    I tried to run Skyrim, but it's missing DLL hell. I wasn't able to run it.
    winetricks vcrun2008

    Leave a comment:

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