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Mozilla Prepares Its Own Web-Based Operating System

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Mozilla Prepares Its Own Web-Based Operating System

    Mozilla Prepares Its Own Web-Based Operating System

    Phoronix: Mozilla Prepares Its Own Web-Based Operating System

    Mozilla has announced today they're effectively working on the development of their own operating system. Mozilla "Boot To Gecko" is basically a Gecko-based competitor to Google's Chrome OS operating system. "Mozilla believes that the web can displace proprietary, single-vendor stacks for application development. To make open web technologies a better basis for future applications on mobile and desktop alike, we need to keep pushing the envelope of the web to include --- and in places exceed --- the capabilities of the competing stacks in question."..

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTcwOQ

  • MaxDaniel
    replied
    Firefox's operating system!!!!!! Sounds good. I am waiting for it. I hope it will create new era of development.

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    In other words, the users also aren't interested in the ability to run Boot to Gecko on the device.
    Developers (particularly in open source development) rarely follow what the wants are of the end users are, I really don't think you can play connect the dots between the two.

    Leave a comment:


  • TwistedLincoln
    replied
    Originally posted by leif81 View Post
    I don't think there's a need to worry. The traditional desktop will be around for decades. It'll just become a niche market occupied by developers and enterprise.
    That's exactly why we NEED to worry. If the traditional desktop goes back to being a specialized product for a niche market, the pricing and feature set will go back to being out of reach to the average person.

    Leave a comment:


  • curaga
    replied
    The developers also aren't interested in the ability to run native code on the device.
    In other words, the users also aren't interested in the ability to run Boot to Gecko on the device.

    Leave a comment:


  • leif81
    replied
    Originally posted by gigaplex View Post
    As for Netflix, there's a big reason I don't want everything going to the web. I'd like to be able to watch my movies, type my documents etc in my country. The way things are going, most stuff will be inaccessible from outside America.
    I don't think there's a need to worry. The traditional desktop will be around for decades. It'll just become a niche market occupied by developers and enterprise.

    Leave a comment:


  • leif81
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post
    Even a simple app like a file browser requires lots of system-level apis like posix IO, file attributes, file type/description, access to env vars, (multi threaded) file transfer, you name it.
    Out of the 200,000 apps in the android market they're all file browsers? No, many are simple trivia games, travel information, weather, recipe books, etc.

    BTW, HTML5 has a file system API.

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by b15hop View Post
    Look at steam for instance. Let's assume you have 150 games and applications installed via steam. That could easily be 500GB of data. Try re-downloading and re-installing that over a mobile network... Not going to happen. Not for a long while yet.
    I don't know about that. Depends on the network. Last month I used over 250 GB of data (thank goodness for unlimited data) tethered to the phone.

    Leave a comment:


  • cl333r
    replied
    Originally posted by leif81 View Post
    Awesome news.

    The interest in native apps baffles me. As a developer I'd much rather develop an "app" that works across all phones, all desktops, all tablets than have to learn a different language and toolkit for each device. The number of cases where access to the native hardware matters is small. I suspect the real reason why "apps" are popular is developers can charge for them.

    Native apps on the android and iOS are just a stepping stone towards completely removing "native" and moving everything into the cloud. Even today the only native apps I have on my desktop are Chrome, VLC and Steam. Netflix is decreasing my need for VLC. And Steam has signed a deal with OnLive so you can bet that one day I won't need a native Steam client to play my games. A few years off, yes. Inevitable, yes.

    Mozilla isn't waiting for the sun to set on native apps, they are helping set the playing field.
    What web app have you created lately that replaces a native app? Even a simple app like a file browser requires lots of system-level apis like posix IO, file attributes, file type/description, access to env vars, (multi threaded) file transfer, you name it.
    Folks who talk for serious about the web apps about to replace the native ones are imo those haven't tried replacing a few such apps.
    Last edited by cl333r; 07-25-2011, 07:57 PM.

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  • gigaplex
    replied
    Originally posted by leif81 View Post
    Even today the only native apps I have on my desktop are Chrome, VLC and Steam.
    I seriously doubt you only have those 3. Installing steam implies you also installed at least one game, otherwise there's not much point having steam. As for Netflix, there's a big reason I don't want everything going to the web. I'd like to be able to watch my movies, type my documents etc in my country. The way things are going, most stuff will be inaccessible from outside America.

    Leave a comment:

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