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Fedora 14 Beta Is Now Available

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Fedora 14 Beta Is Now Available

    Fedora 14 Beta Is Now Available

    Phoronix: Fedora 14 Beta Is Now Available

    Fedora 14 Beta is now available. It features the latest Fedora packages including the improvements to the GNOME 2.32 desktop, Linux 2.6.35 kernel, and much more...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODYzNw

  • cl333r
    replied
    Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
    Thanks, that's actually my thread, I decided to ask on the F14 forum _first_ before trying to file a bug, and as I found out:
    1) I needed to also install tango-devel
    2) There's no support for D2, only for D1.

    All work on D (as I read from the book on D2) is going into D2, while D(1) is in maintenance mode. So to me I'd rather spend my time on D2 only when available.

    Leave a comment:


  • RahulSundaram
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post
    hmm.. I got Fedora 14 beta x64 and when I search for "gdc" it tells me it found "ldc", so back to same story that it can't compile a hello world app.
    You might want to read

    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=252242

    Leave a comment:


  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post
    hmm.. I got Fedora 14 beta x64 and when I search for "gdc" it tells me it found "ldc", so back to same story that it can't compile a hello world app.
    Did you file a bug?

    Leave a comment:


  • gilboa
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    Ah, thanks, so it's faster than Qemu's drawing to a native window. Makes sense.

    On the other hand, would a native window with proper accel not be better than a network protocol on localhost? I wonder why nobody's done that yet in Qemu.
    qemu has SDL mode, which isn't network based. (Such as VNC).
    However, on any modern machine that performance difference (between SDL mode and VNC mode) is barely noticeable, and doesn't worth the missing functionality [read: network transparency]).
    ... Though, I assume that once RedHat/SPICE will start working on 3D acceleration, they may revisit the local system only approach. (Though, at least according to the mailing list, the are looking at ways at getting network-able 3D)

    - Gilboa

    Leave a comment:


  • cl333r
    replied
    hmm.. I got Fedora 14 beta x64 and when I search for "gdc" it tells me it found "ldc", so back to same story that it can't compile a hello world app.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azmo
    replied
    use gdc instead

    Originally posted by cl333r View Post
    Thanks, but I still got same error:
    ldc test.d
    object.d: Error: module object cannot read file 'object.d'
    import path[0] = /usr/include/d/
    import path[1] = /usr/include/d/tango
    import path[2] = /usr/include/d/tango/core/vendor

    File "test.d" is in home dir, compiling with "ldc test.d".
    Does it work for you?
    Strange. If I use "gdc" (gcc front-end) it works fine, e.g:
    $ gdc test.d -o test
    but I can not get "ldc" to work.

    Is currently on ubuntu 10.04. gdc 4.3.4 and ldc 0.9.1.

    Leave a comment:


  • curaga
    replied
    Ah, thanks, so it's faster than Qemu's drawing to a native window. Makes sense.

    On the other hand, would a native window with proper accel not be better than a network protocol on localhost? I wonder why nobody's done that yet in Qemu.

    Leave a comment:


  • jbrown96
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    Yeah, I would be interested too. How does it improve desktop virt?

    As far as I know it's a remote protocol ala VNC or RDP, why would one use that on a desktop?
    There has to be some way for the virtualized GUI to be displayed on your screen. KVM uses the 'cirrus' driver, and the virt-manager interface is the equivalent of vnc-viewer with additional virtualization options.

    SPICE is significantly faster than VNC. It provides accelerated 2D for Linux and Windows guests. It will be possible to play Netflix on Linux via a Windows guest.
    There is a great comparison of how awesome SPICE is here http://www.brianmadden.com/blogs/gab...nce-video.aspx.
    To summarize the SPICE-related video performance, he had a VM server attached via gigabit ethernet to guest systems. With an old version of SPICE (>1 year ago), the clients could perfectly play The Matrix Revolutions in HD (720p I believe) with no choppiness and a/v in sync.
    SPICE also implements a hardware cursor, so you don't see the host pointer and guest pointer (lagging slightly).

    Note that this is accelerated 2D, so there's no way to play games with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • gilboa
    replied
    Originally posted by pvtcupcakes View Post
    I haven't heard of Spice, but it sounds interesting. What about it makes KVM easier?
    If all it does is make Networking less of a PITA, then I'm all for it.
    Simple: Spice gives you 2D acceleration under both Windows and Linux, including cursor support using native X.org and Windows drivers (qxl drivers).
    While I played with an early version of it, the different was striking: No more cursor jerkiness and slow window updates (especially if you opt for -vga std in qemu in-order to use very high resolution).

    While it won't run Aero/7 or Compiz/kwin/Xorg, it should give you near native experience.

    As for virt-manager, well, virt manager is limited to what qemu supplies, either cirrus logic mode (medium performance, very limited resolution set), std (vesa, large number of resolutions to select from, fairly slow) or vmware (somewhat faster then both, highly configurable, very buggy). Spice aims to change all than by adding the qxl virtual device (and its drivers).

    - Gilboa

    Leave a comment:

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