Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SUSE's YaST Team Drops Cockpit With New Installer Code

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Estranged1906
    replied
    I really hope they don't drop any of the myriad hidden features of the existing installer.

    Leave a comment:


  • milo_hoffman
    replied
    OpenSUSE is a hidden gem in the Linux community. Their upcoming immutable desktop distros current in RC, Aeon (Gnome) https://aeondesktop.github.io/ and Kalpa(KDE) are an immutable distro done right. After having spent quite a bit of time with NixOS, Fedora Silberblue/Kinote/Bazzite/Ublue etc, and Vanilla OS, I really think the OpenSuSE team has done it better than all the rest.

    Leave a comment:


  • cakeisamadeupdrug
    replied
    Originally posted by cynic View Post
    they'll never convince me that this BS are better than traditional TUI installer
    It's the most noob-friendly way of setting up btrfs storage pools and bcache at install that I've encountered.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

    You don't even need an ethernet port. Connecting a "fresh" OS to the internet during installation, when it is least protected is a security risk.

    Deterministic offline installs are the way. Then update (again, preferably offline) once the system is suitably locked down.

    Why do people make such a mess of something as simple as installation?
    not really a big deal, that threat model is very small, and a web installer is very convenient. much more then using serial. and way more flexible then an automated singular install script

    Leave a comment:


  • loganj
    replied
    Originally posted by woddy View Post
    Sometimes it happens, but the opposite also happens, I know people who have had problems installing Ubuntu, Mint and other popular distributions while with openSUSE no problems.
    Personally I've never had any problems installing openSUSE, but obviously personal experiences count for very little.
    What is certain is that the openSUSE installation is perhaps the most complete that exists around, you can really decide what to install and what not, it's simple, not very fast but good.​
    i had no problem with installing opensuse. i had problems with making hardware work after install

    Leave a comment:


  • woddy
    replied
    Originally posted by loganj View Post

    last time i've tried to use it i couldn't set the sound card to work as any other distros.
    previous time i had issue with network if i recall correctly
    before that i had other issues that i dont remember anymore.

    to sum it up ive tried but fail to make it work as any ubuntu/mint (that i was using at that time) i was using during those attempts. for you the installer had problems but for me the distro had issues. also i don't really liked that yast.

    but during the times i was discovering linux (ubuntu) i also tried opensuse and it felt better then. but that was a long time ago....i think i had amd thunderbird back then.
    Sometimes it happens, but the opposite also happens, I know people who have had problems installing Ubuntu, Mint and other popular distributions while with openSUSE no problems.
    Personally I've never had any problems installing openSUSE, but obviously personal experiences count for very little.
    What is certain is that the openSUSE installation is perhaps the most complete that exists around, you can really decide what to install and what not, it's simple, not very fast but good.​

    Leave a comment:


  • cynic
    replied
    Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
    Nobody is trying to convince you of anything.
    it's just a saying!

    Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
    Stick with BSD.
    👍🏻

    Leave a comment:


  • piotrj3
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    HTTP, even on the installer...

    Installing openSUSE is a very unpredictable activity - sometimes it installs flawlessly, sometimes workarounds are required to get the installer to show up, and sometimes it fails.
    The resulting installation is consistent though and somehow works better than the installer.

    On my old server, the installer would not start up due to a missing floppy controller. Disabling it in BIOS fixed the issue. Worked flawlessly after installation.
    On this cheap Ryzen laptop, black screen. Had to plug in an HDMI display for it to appear (and eventually found out the brightness was being set to 0). Also worked flawlessly after installation.
    On this old Mac, it failed at the GRUB stage. A manual fix later, and then it works flawlessly as well.

    Otherwise, the installer is simple and straight to the point. I wonder why do people not use openSUSE more...
    I share the experience. When on my machines it was fine, my friend got into situation when wi-fi card didn't work during installation process, but worked flawlessly after install.

    Meanwhile I as nvidia+tumbleweed user, one might think combination of both is bad, but actually never faced problem yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiffmet
    replied
    The trend of turning everything into a webapp is getting silly.

    Leave a comment:


  • kpedersen
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    its loads better when all you have is a real base system and an ethernet port
    You don't even need an ethernet port. Connecting a "fresh" OS to the internet during installation, when it is least protected is a security risk.

    Deterministic offline installs are the way. Then update (again, preferably offline) once the system is suitably locked down.

    Why do people make such a mess of something as simple as installation?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X