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SUSE's YaST Team Drops Cockpit With New Installer Code

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  • SUSE's YaST Team Drops Cockpit With New Installer Code

    Phoronix: SUSE's YaST Team Drops Cockpit With New Installer Code

    SUSE/openSUSE has been busy crafting a next-gen Linux installer that is a web-based installer and originally known as D-Installer but now going by the name Agama...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    HTTP, even on the installer...

    Installing openSUSE is a very unpredictable activity - sometimes it installs flawlessly, sometimes workarounds are required to get the installer to show up, and sometimes it fails.
    The resulting installation is consistent though and somehow works better than the installer.

    On my old server, the installer would not start up due to a missing floppy controller. Disabling it in BIOS fixed the issue. Worked flawlessly after installation.
    On this cheap Ryzen laptop, black screen. Had to plug in an HDMI display for it to appear (and eventually found out the brightness was being set to 0). Also worked flawlessly after installation.
    On this old Mac, it failed at the GRUB stage. A manual fix later, and then it works flawlessly as well.

    Otherwise, the installer is simple and straight to the point. I wonder why do people not use openSUSE more...

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    • #3
      they'll never convince me that this BS are better than traditional TUI installer

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        ...
        Otherwise, the installer is simple and straight to the point. I wonder why do people not use openSUSE more...
        last time i've tried to use it i couldn't set the sound card to work as any other distros.
        previous time i had issue with network if i recall correctly
        before that i had other issues that i dont remember anymore.

        to sum it up ive tried but fail to make it work as any ubuntu/mint (that i was using at that time) i was using during those attempts. for you the installer had problems but for me the distro had issues. also i don't really liked that yast.

        but during the times i was discovering linux (ubuntu) i also tried opensuse and it felt better then. but that was a long time ago....i think i had amd thunderbird back then.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cynic View Post
          they'll never convince me that this BS are better than traditional TUI installer
          You're not the intended audience. Nobody is trying to convince you of anything. Stick with BSD.

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          • #6
            Not too ago I did a minimal openSUSE Tumbleweed VM install. Cannot remember install process, but no issues. Sway runs fine on a 5th Gen i7 virtualized on top of UTM/QEMU. All and all feels pretty polished.

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            • #7
              Automated Bootstrap Script beats all GUI installers

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                HTTP, even on the installer...
                Makes sense if remote install is a major usecase.

                Fedora/Red Hat are also working towards a Cockpit-based anaconda installer. It has been pushed back a couple of releases but might have a version available for the Workstation installer in Fedora 41.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cynic View Post
                  they'll never convince me that this BS are better than traditional TUI installer
                  its loads better when all you have is a real base system and an ethernet port

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                    its loads better when all you have is a real base system and an ethernet port
                    You don't even need an ethernet port. Connecting a "fresh" OS to the internet during installation, when it is least protected is a security risk.

                    Deterministic offline installs are the way. Then update (again, preferably offline) once the system is suitably locked down.

                    Why do people make such a mess of something as simple as installation?

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