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Ubuntu 24.04 Brings Some Performance Gains For AMD Threadripper 7980X / System76 Thelio Major

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  • kylew77
    replied
    Originally posted by tenchrio View Post

    They don't lock it, you can force it with the "sudo do-release-upgrade" command.
    But they only prompt/offer you to upgrade after the .1 release, this has been the case for a while, my guess would be to get more tech-savvy people in first which tend to be more familiarized with writing bug reports.
    All the family members I manage their Xubuntu releases for I use do-release-upgrade on, but if I recall to get to the next lts last time you had to pass the development flag to it because it wouldn't detect the new OS until the .1 release. That is what I meant by locking.

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  • tenchrio
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post

    IF I recall, the upgrade from 20.04 to 22.04 was that way. I was itching to upgrade a few systems and I think there was a Phoronix article about it saying that the devs were locking upgrades to the new LTS from old LTS until the .1 release. Figure this way will be the same.
    They don't lock it, you can force it with the "sudo do-release-upgrade" command.
    But they only prompt/offer you to upgrade after the .1 release, this has been the case for a while, my guess would be to get more tech-savvy people in first which tend to be more familiarized with writing bug reports.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarkFoss
    replied
    uname -r 6.5.0-27-generic was released on Monday or from uname -a:
    6.5.0-27-generic #28~22.04.1-Ubuntu SMP PREEMPT_DYNAMIC Fri Mar 15 10:51:06 UTC 2 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
    ‚Äč

    Leave a comment:


  • kylew77
    replied
    Originally posted by geerge View Post
    What kernel is 22.04 on? Zen4 is new enough that even if it works on an older kernel it probably benefits from being relatively current. My rule of thumb is keep hardware on bleeding edge software until at least 2 years after it was first released, YMMV.
    Ubuntu and its derivatives use a rolling release kind of technique with Xorg and kernels nowadays were those two pieces get migrated back 6 months after the next inirum release. That means 22.04 is running the same kernel that is found in either 23.04 or 23.10, it is a 6.x series kernel for sure. BUT a key point here is those are the only pieces that are upgraded, all the applications stay old for 2 years in there.

    Leave a comment:


  • kylew77
    replied
    Originally posted by metallurge View Post
    IMHO, people who are on 22.04 will likely stay there for a while after 24.04 is released, typically until 24.04.1 or so.
    IF I recall, the upgrade from 20.04 to 22.04 was that way. I was itching to upgrade a few systems and I think there was a Phoronix article about it saying that the devs were locking upgrades to the new LTS from old LTS until the .1 release. Figure this way will be the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • metallurge
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    I don't want to complain but showing 22.04 to 24.04 might have been the better comparison. Just about everyone I know who uses {u,x,l,k}buntu uses an LTS.
    IMHO, people who are on 22.04 will likely stay there for a while after 24.04 is released, typically until 24.04.1 or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • geerge
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    Nice article! I don't want to complain but showing 22.04 to 24.04 might have been the better comparison. Just about everyone I know who uses {u,x,l,k}buntu uses an LTS. I thought the maker of Ubuntu was even on the record of saying the .10 and .4 that aren't LTS releases are more beta releases to prep for the next LTS. Just food for thought. Your website Michael so do what you will of course.
    What kernel is 22.04 on? Zen4 is new enough that even if it works on an older kernel it probably benefits from being relatively current. My rule of thumb is keep hardware on bleeding edge software until at least 2 years after it was first released, YMMV.

    Leave a comment:


  • kylew77
    replied
    Nice article! I don't want to complain but showing 22.04 to 24.04 might have been the better comparison. Just about everyone I know who uses {u,x,l,k}buntu uses an LTS. I thought the maker of Ubuntu was even on the record of saying the .10 and .4 that aren't LTS releases are more beta releases to prep for the next LTS. Just food for thought. Your website Michael so do what you will of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kjell
    replied
    This is why I enjoy updating my Linux systems

    Updating Windows usually introduces new bloat and no performance enhancements (apart from stability updates).

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubuntu 24.04 Brings Some Performance Gains For AMD Threadripper 7980X / System76 Thelio Major

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 24.04 Brings Some Performance Gains For AMD Threadripper 7980X / System76 Thelio Major

    With Ubuntu 24.04 LTS due out later this month and the beta now available, I've been spending more time recently testing out the latest development state for this next Long Term Support installment of Ubuntu Linux. Similar to seeing some Ubuntu 24.04 performance gains on server class hardware both from Intel and AMD, testing on workstation hardware is also showing some gains over the current Ubuntu 23.10 release. Here are some comparison tests of the System76 Thelio Major with AMD Ryzen Threadripper 7980X.

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite
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