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Fedora Linux 40 Looks To Replace iotop With iotop-c

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  • yump
    replied
    Also there's bpf-filetop from libbpf-tools if you want to see what files the I/O is touching. Doesn't show full paths, alas, but if the heavy hitters are "scaling_cur_freq" repeated 4 times on a 4-CPU machine, it's not hard to guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • andrei_me
    replied
    Maybe you can use nethogs for checking process consuming network bandwidth

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  • geearf
    replied
    Originally posted by gotar View Post

    Don't try to run iftop or iptraf (actually nothing pcap-based) on heavily used interfaces with zillions of connections. Well, iftop handles only single interface at a time.

    I use bwm-ng on 10+ Gb/s traffic with 0.5M connections using 30+ network interfaces with 0.066 s refresh rate.
    I only have one, well 2 with VPN so I'm okay.
    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • gotar
    replied
    Originally posted by geearf View Post
    [bwm-ng]
    Hmmm, I did not know that one but after trying it it does not seem to really add anything particular compared to those above.
    Don't try to run iftop or iptraf (actually nothing pcap-based) on heavily used interfaces with zillions of connections. Well, iftop handles only single interface at a time.

    I use bwm-ng on 10+ Gb/s traffic with 0.5M connections using 30+ network interfaces with 0.066 s refresh rate.

    Leave a comment:


  • geearf
    replied

    Originally posted by S.Pam View Post

    There is just overall network tx/rx of the system. At least my htop doesn't have network meters per process.
    Yeah I couldn't find it either. :/​

    Originally posted by GreenReaper View Post

    I like 'iftop' for the bar graphs, although it doesn't seem to do the association to process that bandwich does.
    iftop is nice to see by IPs, but that is less often useful.


    Originally posted by Serafean View Post

    iptraf-ng.

    But I second atop as the swiss army knife. It also supports creating a history file. atop -B for fun graphs. Atop with "netatop" can also show per process network stats.
    I didn't know iptraf-ng, it displays a lot of useful info!
    It's too bad it looks like a DOS-era program though.

    atop also seems to display a lot of stuff, actually so much it feels overwhelming, I may have to slowly dig into it.



    Originally posted by gotar View Post

    My favourite one is bwm-ng.
    Hmmm, I did not know that one but after trying it it does not seem to really add anything particular compared to those above.


    Thanks everyone!

    Leave a comment:


  • gotar
    replied
    Originally posted by geearf View Post
    edit: actually with this I don't know if I'll need any iotop anymore. Is there the same for network? Currently I use bandwich for that.
    My favourite one is bwm-ng.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serafean
    replied
    Originally posted by geearf View Post

    I never realized that, thank you!

    edit: actually with this I don't know if I'll need any iotop anymore. Is there the same for network? Currently I use bandwich for that.
    iptraf-ng.

    But I second atop as the swiss army knife. It also supports creating a history file. atop -B for fun graphs. Atop with "netatop" can also show per process network stats.
    Last edited by Serafean; 23 January 2024, 06:13 AM.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Is there a way to see on which storage device I/O is actually happening? I have three of them, and just seeing an overall number doesn't mean much to me. I'd like to see the numbers for each storage device.
    I'm old school, in that I just use iostat -x 1

    It gives you a full breakdown by device and by statistic.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreenReaper
    replied
    Originally posted by geearf View Post
    edit: actually with this I don't know if I'll need any iotop anymore. Is there the same for network? Currently I use bandwich for that.
    I like 'iftop' for the bar graphs, although it doesn't seem to do the association to process that bandwich does.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nth_man
    replied
    Originally posted by Eberhardt View Post

    [...] unsafe Rust leads to memory safety issues because it deliberately disables most compiler checks to give programmers more freedom.
    Mmm... "bugs in a number of packages, including the Rust standard library and the Rust compiler as well as the 30 most popular crates based on their downloads."

    Leave a comment:

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