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  • #31
    yes, you can use a symlink... but explain to me why that is a better option?

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    • #32
      because the symlink points to a versioned vmlinuz file and suddenly you know exactly which kernel will be booted. Even better, you can have douzends of kernels in /boot without any problems - if you want to boot a different one, just change the symlink. Wow, that is easy. And such a good thing to have.

      But hey, continue to sell your distri as the next best thing. It is time to replace ubuntu as the greatest since sliced bread.

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      • #33
        Gosh, energyman you just don't get it. You can put a version number to the filename if you insist, but it's not necessary. The version number is there even if it's not in the filename.

        How difficult is for you to grasp this?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by energyman View Post
          But hey, continue to sell your distri as the next best thing. It is time to replace ubuntu as the greatest since sliced bread.
          right, because linux is definately not about choice, and one version is obviously and irrefutably the best, it doesn't matter that different distro's have completely different approaches to things, there is a *right* way do to something and a *wrong* way. and no matter what you say my choice is the *right* way.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
            Gosh, energyman you just don't get it. You can put a version number to the filename if you insist, but it's not necessary. The version number is there even if it's not in the filename.

            How difficult is for you to grasp this?
            vmlinuz

            which version is that?

            and if you system updated the kernel, and the new one is called 'vmlinuz' how do you make sure it is the new one? Now you want to go back to an earlier version - because the new one is broken. Which one to choose?
            vmlinuz?
            or
            vmlinuz?

            but continue to amuse me.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by energyman View Post
              vmlinuz

              which version is that?
              Ask the package manager.

              Originally posted by energyman View Post
              and if you system updated the kernel, and the new one is called 'vmlinuz' how do you make sure it is the new one? Now you want to go back to an earlier version - because the new one is broken. Which one to choose?
              vmlinuz?
              or
              vmlinuz?
              Ask the package manager.

              You can also use the package manager to rollback. RTFM.

              Originally posted by energyman View Post
              but continue to amuse me.
              Crawl back to your hole.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                Ask the package manager
                But what if you have multiple kernels installed?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Apopas View Post
                  But what if you have multiple kernels installed?
                  Didn't you use the package manager to install those kernels?

                  To install a kernel, you'll probably write or download a PKGBUILD, create a package and install it with "pacman -U". Which means the package manager is well aware of any kernels you have installed.

                  If you actually subverted pacman by installing the kernel manually, well you broke it and you get to keep the pieces.

                  Edit: read the following for more information.

                  http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/...ation_with_ABS
                  http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/...on_From_Source
                  Last edited by BlackStar; 08-21-2009, 08:09 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                    Didn't you use the package manager to install those kernels?

                    To install a kernel, you'll probably write or download a PKGBUILD, create a package and install it with "pacman -U". Which means the package manager is well aware of any kernels you have installed.

                    If you actually subverted pacman by installing the kernel manually, well you broke it and you get to keep the pieces.
                    That's apparent, I mean the package manager lets you install multiple kernels simultaneously? If yes then what names do the images have?

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Apopas View Post
                      That's apparent, I mean the package manager lets you install multiple kernels simultaneously? If yes then what names do the images have?
                      Yes, you can install multiple kernels simultaneously. The process is trivial and the images have whichever name you decide to give them.

                      Seriously, read the links above. The sample PKGBUILD recommends using the LOCALVERSION variable to define unique custom names in the form kernel26%LOCALVERSION%. However, you are free to ignore this and use a completely custom name: kernel-2.6.69-energyman-special.

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