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Ubuntu 23.10 Is Maxing Out Zstd Compression For Its Kernel Build

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  • geearf
    replied
    1.3x less disk space used (548MB vs 742MB)
    How do you get 130% less disk space used? Isn't it like 26% less? Even if you were doing 742/548 (but why would you?), that would still only be about 35%.
    Is math that hard?

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  • Jabberwocky
    replied
    Originally posted by Malsabku View Post
    These kind of optimisations are the reason why Ubuntu is better for the desktop than Debian.
    Low quality bait

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  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by jabl View Post

    I found this thread where someone proposed changing the default from xz to zstd: https://lists.debian.org/debian-deve.../msg00200.html

    Seems the consensus from that thread is that they don't want that, as the space advantages of xz helps mirrors and BW.
    I think the key comment was:

    > Ubuntu already did it years ago‚Äč

    I'm not convinced by any counter arguments in that thread. Sounds more like the usual Debian inertia to me.

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  • tenplus1
    replied
    I'm happy to hear that Canonical are working on lowering memory use since the system requirements to run most Ubuntu flavours shot up from 22.04 to 23.04 by an average of 350MB.

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  • jabl
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

    Not sure either, but support for it doesn't help if it's not enabled in actual packages. Versions are bumped over time, but decompression still feels pretty slow. They should just change the default for the whole archive and be done beating around the bush.
    I found this thread where someone proposed changing the default from xz to zstd: https://lists.debian.org/debian-deve.../msg00200.html

    Seems the consensus from that thread is that they don't want that, as the space advantages of xz helps mirrors and BW.

    Leave a comment:


  • jabl
    replied
    Originally posted by satadru View Post
    Hopefully, they will work on getting the changes they have made upstreamed... It doesn't look like these are large patches...
    AFAIU it's all upstreamed already, it's just a change in the Ubuntu configuration how they create the packages. Based on some quick googling, zstd compressed kernel modules have been supported since 5.13, and zstd compressed firmware images have been supported since kernel 5.19.

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  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by jabl View Post

    Support was added to upstream dpkg 1.21.18 per https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugr...cgi?bug=892664 and the latest stable, Debian 12, ships with dpkg version 1.21.22 https://packages.debian.org/bookworm/dpkg

    Now Debian doesn't do archive-wide rebuilds, so I guess it'll take a while for actual zstd usage to propagate into the archive. Not sure whether this is something each individual package must opt-in to, or if the defaults will be changed to use zstd.
    Not sure either, but support for it doesn't help if it's not enabled in actual packages. Versions are bumped over time, but decompression still feels pretty slow. They should just change the default for the whole archive and be done beating around the bush.

    Leave a comment:


  • jabl
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
    Meanwhile, can Debain already enable zstd for packages for faster decompression? I don't think they ever did.
    Support was added to upstream dpkg 1.21.18 per https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugr...cgi?bug=892664 and the latest stable, Debian 12, ships with dpkg version 1.21.22 https://packages.debian.org/bookworm/dpkg

    Now Debian doesn't do archive-wide rebuilds, so I guess it'll take a while for actual zstd usage to propagate into the archive. Not sure whether this is something each individual package must opt-in to, or if the defaults will be changed to use zstd.

    Leave a comment:


  • shmerl
    replied
    Meanwhile, can Debain already enable zstd for packages for faster decompression? I don't think they ever did.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarterX4
    replied
    Lmao. Now it's not just the initrd generation taking ages with their max compression, now it's also kernel updates (package installation).

    Imagine having a not-customized Ubuntu on some legacy hardware, or just Server on Free-tier Oracle Cloud, or Amazon T2.Small/Micro.
    Setting initramfs compression to LZO is must-be.

    They would better optimize their kernels, or provide one for x86_64-v3, maybe even with ZEN or ClearLinux patches.

    Leave a comment:

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