Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fedora 40 Eyes Dropping GNOME X11 Session Support

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #71
    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    Fedora has made you think they pushed things forward. Red Hat are good at influencing people into thinking their stuff is good, but they've been holding back Linux desktop for years.
    Without Red Hat (and Valve to a certain extent), the Linux desktop would've been stuck in the early 2000's, when you had to manually configure things like xorg.conf and pray it'll even work on your hardware. So it's an illusion to think that without Red Hat, Linux would magically move forward. Maybe you know another company which can move it forward? no? Because you know, you need corporate support to really push things forward. And separate volunteers / hobbyists who do it for free can't do it single handedly. I'm not saying absolutely everything what Red Hat does is perfect, but thinking it has an alternative is schizophrenic.

    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    I really wish there was a distribution not using a single piece of software designed by Red Hat. It would probably actually push things forward.
    I know for some people it's cool hating on everything related to Red Hat, but like it or not, Red Hat is behind many of the freedesktop standards like dbus, which are used in virtually every Linux distro and as said above, it's also behind significant contributions to the Linux kernel. So you can't really "get away" from it. If you don't like it, stop using Linux.

    And now, please can you give us a comprehensive explanation of how does Red Hat "hold back" the Linux desktop instead of spewing baseless hate?
    Last edited by user1; 20 September 2023, 10:12 AM.

    Comment


    • #72
      Originally posted by avis View Post

      This is the cringest comment from a Linux fan I've seen in 25 years. It's not just wrong, it looks like as it it was made in an alternative universe entirely.

      RedHat has given us:
      • A stable distribution you can run up to 12 years while maintaining the same software stack and kernel drivers
      • A hassle free power audio system, PulseAudio and then PipeWire (ALSA with dmix was a hell to set up, esound/artsd never really worked correctly)
      • systemd (Luddites hate it but it's allowed to speed up the boot process by a factor of 10 or more, it simplified and removed the need for pages long fragile bash scripts, it streamlined system configuration)
      • The company has maintained and contributed to the Gnome software stack and related libraries, the Linux kernel, the Xorg server, Wayland we are discussing now and many others
      • A ton of enterprise Linux features including KVM, docker, flatpack, etc. etc.
      Without RedHat Linux would have been taken back by at least a decade or two.

      Fedora may look like it's an experimental distro except I've been running it without major issues since version 1.0. I only skipped a couple of releases when systemd was first introduced: it was really rough but the company needed to break it in.
      Did hell just freeze over? Did Birdie just post a useful and sensible comment?!

      There is a first for anything i know but I feel a disturbance in the world of holy leather jackets.

      Comment


      • #73
        Originally posted by oiaohm View Post


        Cosmos is debian that NetFlix uses internally for video rendering. So a different business critical area of NetFlix is Linux.

        One of the reasons NetFlix using FreeBSD on the caches is why Sony uses FreeBSD on the playsation 5. We don't want clients asking for source code and that we might have to hand over something business critical.
        Yeah I don't think that's right. I actually would be thousands that there's no business secret that Netflix would have to share if it ran Linux. They run BSD because their IT stack seems to like it.

        Comment


        • #74
          Originally posted by Hibbelharry View Post

          Did hell just freeze over? Did Birdie just post a useful and sensible comment?!

          There is a first for anything i know but I feel a disturbance in the world of holy leather jackets.
          I actually had to like it...

          IMAGINE

          Comment


          • #75
            Originally posted by jorgepl View Post
            Yeah I don't think that's right. I actually would be thousands that there's no business secret that Netflix would have to share if it ran Linux. They run BSD because their IT stack seems to like it.
            BSD has a simple problem which doesn't exist in the same magnitude in linux: People don't give back to the project, there is no need or obligation. Netflix surely has implemented some very nice networking and server software components, but those won't ever surface anywhere. The same goes for many other companies doing the same. That means while one party has a nice network stack another company does will have a pretty impressive DBMS but there will be noone having a nice network stack and a pretty impressive DBMS at the same time and thats why BSD overall stalls in improvement in many areas.

            Comment


            • #76
              A move I have been hoping for for some years now.
              So they're almost ready to flush X11. Exciting !

              Comment


              • #77
                Originally posted by jorgepl View Post
                Yeah I don't think that's right. I actually would be thousands that there's no business secret that Netflix would have to share if it ran Linux. They run BSD because their IT stack seems to like it.
                We set up a honeypot by publishing AWS credentials in public GitHub repositories to find out how attackers find and abuse them.


                I said business critical not business secret. Its happens more than we want to admit when parties hand over source code that they include items like credentials why hackers basically search github and other places for them.

                Remember jorgepl Linux stuff is used at netflix on hardware that netflix either owns or pays to use at AWS. The "Open Connect Appliance" as caching server that BSD is used on is sold to ISP and the like. So it simple to use BSD where they don't have to hand over the source code and they don't need to audit the source code to make sure it does not contain critical credentials and other business critical things.

                Just think for one min netflix hands over source code to a ISP and by opps it contains netflix master aws password and that leaks up on github somehow.

                The open source licenses don't say that you have to share business secrets but you have to allow for human error. Just because you don't have to share something does not mean you will not by mistake or free will. Not having to share source code of the "Open Connect Appliance" removes one area of Netflix to screw up.
                ‚Äč

                Comment


                • #78
                  Originally posted by Hibbelharry View Post

                  BSD has a simple problem which doesn't exist in the same magnitude in linux: People don't give back to the project, there is no need or obligation. Netflix surely has implemented some very nice networking and server software components, but those won't ever surface anywhere. The same goes for many other companies doing the same. That means while one party has a nice network stack another company does will have a pretty impressive DBMS but there will be noone having a nice network stack and a pretty impressive DBMS at the same time and thats why BSD overall stalls in improvement in many areas.
                  That's not entirely correct, plenty give back. One FreeBSD core committer is an employee of Netflix and he does a lot of project work on company time. Just because the license isn't copyleft doesn't mean organizations don't contribute, they are just more flexible in how they do so. In many cases its actually easier for a company to maintain their own product by getting their changes committed so they don't need to deal with a divergent code base apart from the project. A lot of code is committed this way-- the FreeBSD release notes regularly indicate significant contributions done by various companies wanting to make things better as a whole.
                  Don't expect much and seldom disappointed.

                  Comment


                  • #79
                    Originally posted by avis View Post

                    This is the cringest comment from a Linux fan I've seen in 25 years. It's not just wrong, it looks like as it it was made in an alternative universe entirely.

                    RedHat has given us:
                    • A stable distribution you can run up to 12 years while maintaining the same software stack and kernel drivers
                    • A hassle free power audio system, PulseAudio and then PipeWire (ALSA with dmix was a hell to set up, esound/artsd never really worked correctly)
                    • systemd (Luddites hate it but it's allowed to speed up the boot process by a factor of 10 or more, it simplified and removed the need for pages long fragile bash scripts, it streamlined system configuration)
                    • The company has maintained and contributed to the Gnome software stack and related libraries, the Linux kernel, the Xorg server, Wayland we are discussing now and many others
                    • A ton of enterprise Linux features including KVM, docker, flatpack, etc. etc.
                    Without RedHat Linux would have been taken back by at least a decade or two.

                    Fedora may look like it's an experimental distro except I've been running it without major issues since version 1.0. I only skipped a couple of releases when systemd was first introduced: it was really rough but the company needed to break it in.
                    Redhat gave linux many things.
                    Unfortunately the only thing that remains of Redhat mid 2023 is the logo. IBM fired most of the staff

                    the rest are leaving of their own free will and IBM completely reoriented their remaining staff to try and be more like Microsoft, which while it may make sense at face value, is pretty much never going to work out for them.

                    I'd say Fedora dropping X11 for wayland is wayland's last chance (and to a certain degree RH). If it doesn't work out (and it wont), even more heads will roll, only this time in upper management.

                    Comment


                    • #80
                      According to the article they fired just 4% of the staff. "Most" AFAIK means at the very least 51% but I normally think of something above 75%.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X