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Linux From Scratch 12.0 Published For Rolling Your Own Linux Build

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  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow
    Using Debian with a 6.5 kernel, custom Mesa, Intel OneVPL, Vulkan, LLVM, ffmpeg, the entire shitton of av codecs and V4L2 LFS-ed over it.

    Fucking pain to maintain and basically means installing crosscompile tools or installing WINE is no longer possible because the repository will insist on overriding my custom stuff.
    Don't install them in /usr then???

    Install them in a custom path and add them to ld.so.conf or PATH, or in worst case, put them in /usr/local.

    Wine doesn't even need all that bullshit. Literally can place it anywhere you want and run it from there, since it looks up its libs relatively.

    Leave a comment:


  • erniv2
    replied
    Does anybody remember DistroWatch.com: ROCK Linux​ ?

    Back then it used a script to download tarballs and compile the packages but i never got to run it, it allways ended with compile errors.

    Is this the same concept ?

    Where you can just specifiy -march=native and it builds everything for your cpu?

    Leave a comment:


  • J.King
    replied
    Originally posted by dlq84 View Post

    When you say "Linux documentation suck", what do you mean? I think it's actually pretty good: https://docs.kernel.org/

    And I mean, LFS is one giant documentation on how you build a distro from scratch. How does that suck?
    I too was a little puzzled by that. Coming from Windows I was dazzled by how good Linux documentation is on the whole. I haven't had much cause to look at kernel documentation, but the few times I've poked there (mostly filesystem-related) I found the answer my problem, so no complaints. Systemd's documentation is great, too.

    If Linux documentation sucks I'd love to hear an example of good documentation, because it must be amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • creative
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    Because vanilla Arch is just the bare minimum to run and update a terminal based system. From there you can turn it into anything you'd like. The big benefit with Arch is that they ship packages as vanilla as possible. They do just enough patching to get software to compile. They're not like Debian, Fedora, SUSE, and other major distributions that massively patch software to meet their specific needs.

    Have you ever gone through all that effort to install another distribution with systemd?

    Have you ever gone through all that effort to install another distribution with systemd.....on weed?

    That's the way to do it man. It's just whaaaaak. pop
    Used systemd from 2011 up until this year. No but I used to get shitfaced drunk in my mid twenties and would install slackware and would configure and build custom kernels back then all in a single evening.

    I'm now in my 40's had enough partying and systemd.

    Like I said I don't have any mad skills or anything. I want to learn a massive amount of stuff. I'm a perpetual noob.

    Also installing Artix by command line is extremely similar to vanilla Arch, both times I installed it I had very few packages with a working desktop 700 something odd packages if I remember correctly.

    I think systemd is great for a lot of people but for me I am not a fan of its process supervision.
    Last edited by creative; 02 September 2023, 09:10 AM.

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  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by szymon_g View Post

    you had a dual socket machine? bourgeoisie

    So did I. It was an eBay special that cost me less than a new CPU would now. Heck, you could probably go dual socket now for under $300. Westmere era stuff is dirt cheap.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by creative View Post
    I never would install vanilla Arch, my reason always was, why all that effort to only install another distribution with systemd? Thus installing Artix from command line was an instant jump for me after I wanted to try something new.
    Because vanilla Arch is just the bare minimum to run and update a terminal based system. From there you can turn it into anything you'd like. The big benefit with Arch is that they ship packages as vanilla as possible. They do just enough patching to get software to compile. They're not like Debian, Fedora, SUSE, and other major distributions that massively patch software to meet their specific needs.

    Have you ever gone through all that effort to install another distribution with systemd?

    Have you ever gone through all that effort to install another distribution with systemd.....on weed?

    That's the way to do it man. It's just whaaaaak. pop

    Leave a comment:


  • joaquinvacas
    replied
    That unemployed friend any tuesday at 03:22 AM...

    Jokes aside, looks very interesting and fun for learning.

    Leave a comment:


  • szymon_g
    replied
    Originally posted by junkbustr View Post
    I did LFS 23 years ago when recovering from an accident. My biggest achievement was modifying the build scripts for Xorg to have more parallelism on dual-processor machines. It was fun.
    you had a dual socket machine? bourgeoisie

    Leave a comment:


  • creative
    replied
    Originally posted by NobodyXu View Post
    creative I would recommend trying out Arch and Gentoo before LFS.
    Gentoo is a source-based distro which is the same idea of LFS but much more convenient and easier to upgrade.
    Already did a couple of command line installs of Artix using s6. Each time I had my system up and configured fairly shortly. I'm not saying I have amazing skills but no thanks. As I said LFS is a bucket list thing.

    People give too much weight to Arch and Gentoo. Arch holds your hand once your system is up with it's package manager. If I am going to wait that long for a bunch of stuff to compile in Gentoo I might as well actually go LFS and actually learn some stuff instead of someone elses distribution install process.

    Arch is not hard, Gentoo is cause it's a lot of time waiting for stuff to compile.

    Obtw I listened to an hour long podcast of some guy that had been using Arch for years, he expressed a lot of frustration using Slackware. I have no frustrations with it. Also another guy a big Gentoo fan hated Slackware and I was listening to his frustrations on youtube saying to myself "Is this guy serious, you have to be joking me?" His biggest beef was not being able to use sudo ahahahahah hah geeze, I had that setup
    and working on Slackware just like on Ubuntu or any other run of the mill new fangled complementary on modern distributions. I reverted back from sudo removing wheel from my user account. Just no, I won't get too far into it but here is my take on sudo. Super user in get your shit done then type exit hit enter type exit hit enter and make it a habit. I'm cleaning up what I consider bad habits not making more of them.

    If you use sudo and leave a terminal open after you just used it and had to go to the restroom I could walk up to your system take complete control of it changing all of your passwords sending you up the creek without a paddle and I am not even a hacker. You could probably set a one second timer on sudo somehow but meh.

    Slackware is easy to install but after you install it, now what? I have no issues post installation. I have added all the software I could ever want and need on both Slackware current and Slackware stable. Some of it I manually compiled.

    In the end I chucked Artix, s6 boots insanely fast and is an awesome init system but one thing I noticed in Slackware compared to it and the very reason I ditched it. Slackware on the desktop with both Plasma and XFCE absolutely rips like a mad motherfucker. Artix felt unresponsive compared to both current and stable.

    I never would install vanilla Arch, my reason always was, why all that effort to only install another distribution with systemd? Thus installing Artix from command line was an instant jump for me after I wanted to try something new.
    Last edited by creative; 02 September 2023, 08:50 AM.

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  • NobodyXu
    replied
    creative I would recommend trying out Arch and Gentoo before LFS.
    Gentoo is a source-based distro which is the same idea of LFS but much more convenient and easier to upgrade.

    Leave a comment:

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