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AlmaLinux No Longer Aims For 1:1 Compatibility With RHEL

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Barley9432 View Post
    So exactly what CentOS Stream is doing, but instead Stream actually contributes to upstream instead of being leeches feeding of RedHat and giving nothing in return.

    Hopefully these leech rebuilds like Alma, Rocky, Oracle all shutdown. They have been taking advantage of the good will of open source for far too long.
    You probably want to look up "leeches" and understand how that works before posting again, troll.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Barley9432 View Post
      So exactly what CentOS Stream is doing, but instead Stream actually contributes to upstream instead of being leeches feeding of RedHat and giving nothing in return.

      Hopefully these leech rebuilds like Alma, Rocky, Oracle all shutdown. They have been taking advantage of the good will of open source for far too long.
      It will be nice if IBM can also create a "frozen" version of Stream that basically functions like RHEL sans the rolling updates to the core repositories.

      This will allow CentOS to act like a stable beta of the next RHEL version and not have the headaches that come from dealing with rolling updates.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Barley9432 View Post
        So exactly what CentOS Stream is doing, but instead Stream actually contributes to upstream instead of being leeches feeding of RedHat and giving nothing in return.

        Hopefully these leech rebuilds like Alma, Rocky, Oracle all shutdown. They have been taking advantage of the good will of open source for far too long.
        did you just call alma of all people a leech? Alma and oracle are very active contributors to the rhel and linux ecosystem at large, people can hate on them all they like, but oracle especially, linux would be in a far worse state, and this includes rhel, without oracle, and alma have been good contributors to the larger rhel ecosystem.

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        • #14
          So much drama about this, with name calling and everything. The way I see it, RHEL compatibility was basically just a standard for corporate use of Linux, and RedHat decided to kill that.
          So something else will have to happen now. This probably won't be that big of a deal in the long run, and I bet it ends up hurting RedHat more than helping them.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
            In the end, all of this uncertainty around RHEL will undoubtedly boost the adoption of Ubuntu LTS in enterprises, especially in non-US[A] territories.
            I can see this happening. From my perspective in the USA, one client only has a couple dozen rhel systems left as they've been on the war path to remove it all and go with ubuntu. Their red hat reps just can't seem to understand why.

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            • #16
              CentOS Stream is compatible with RHEL.

              In fact, Red Hat encourages that developers use CentOS Stream for development because if it works on CentOS Stream it will work on RHEL.

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              • #17
                I personally never saw bug-for-bug as such a desirable goal.

                "The same bugs as RedHat, and just as glacially slow (if not slower) to fix them".

                Wow, how exciting.

                I think Alma's new idea of cloning RHEL but fixing things in a reasonable period of time would be much more enticing.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by novideo View Post
                  Oracle, Alma, and Rocky should team up and at least maintain compatibility between themselves, and API/ABI compatibility with RHEL. Then in 2025 Oracle should base the next version of Oracle Linux on Debian 13 instead of RHEL, and commercialize it by selling 8-10 year support contracts like RHEL does, but unlike Ubuntu, maintain full compatibility with Debian. The Debian volunteers will still give Oracle reduced maintenance burden, like RHEL did, and they can improve their PR by employing Debian engineers and contributing everything upstream, improve Debian upstream, release ZFS under a license compatible with mainline Linux, and join the OIN. They may never have a chance this big to change their image, so they better not miss it.
                  OAR Linux
                  Paddle That Stream

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                  • #19
                    Good.

                    Now Red Hat needs to finish turning the screws by taking a page out of the NFL's playbook.

                    For those of you that don't know the NFL strictly control who and how the name Super Bowl is used, for instance you may have noticed that in any none NFL commercial it is always referred to as "The Big Game" or something similar but no one outside the NFL is allowed to use Super Bowl because it is trademarked and the NFL aggressively protects that trademark.

                    Red Hat should do the same thing and say that going forward no one is allowed to claim they are or are not binary or bug-for-bug compatible with RHEL, Red Hat or any reference to Red Hat's software.

                    If these people want to build a Linux based business then let them do it on their own, no more free ride.

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                    • #20
                      So I'm here, I hate the technical direction that Canonical is going. I hate the commercial direction that RHEL is going. I guess I'm going to move to SUSE... If they fuck it up I might just push to move everything to fucking Windows server, at least Microsoft is consistant and won't rugpull support without warning.

                      And for people who say that Oracle/Alma/Rocky are just leechers, turns out Red Hat is also "leeching" from the entire Linux ecosystem. If they want to have an OS that can't be cloned I guess they should just make a closed source one and stop fucking around.

                      And I know that Red Hat is one of the largest, if not the largest individual contributor to that ecosystem. But turns out their "leechers" also are, Oracle in particular is a huge contributor.

                      One way or another, I think this is a pretty short sighted move. Free clones are a great way to onboard new users, bringing more certification money, more mindshare and more sysadmins pushing to use the thing they already know how to use in their companies. For companies its a perfect development target, without having to mess with licensing their potentially short-lived dev machines. All in all I think long term this will erode RHEL as the standard "professional" Linux.

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