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Debian 12 "Bookworm" Enters Its Hard Freeze

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  • #11
    Just compile your own minimal kernel and set the default there. Problem solved! 😸

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    • #12
      Originally posted by barti_ddu View Post
      If You are using cpufrequtils then just set the GOVERNOR variable in /etc/default/cpufrequtils​.

      However, I would probably just use the cpupower (from the linux-cpupower package) with a simple systemd unit like this:

      Code:
      [Unit]
      Description=CPU governor service
      [Service]
      Type=oneshot
      ExecStart=/usr/bin/cpupower -c all frequency-set -g performance
      [Install]
      WantedBy=multi-user.target
      Nice to see my custom systemd service script actually getting used in the wild!

      But one thing I've changed since then is to drop the "-c all" part, because I noticed on one of my machines that the very last CPU core was still defaulting to "schedutil" instead of the performance governor, weirdly enough.

      Also, running the command without specifying to use all available CPU cores/threads will successfully set the appropriate governor for all of them, anyway.

      So the better systemd service file should look like the following:

      Code:
      [Unit]
      Description=CPU performance governor
      [Service]
      Type=oneshot
      ExecStart=/usr/bin/cpupower frequency-set -g performance
      [Install]
      WantedBy=multi-user.target
      Cheers!​

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

        Nice to see my custom systemd service script actually getting used in the wild!

        But one thing I've changed since then is to drop the "-c all" part, because I noticed on one of my machines that the very last CPU core was still defaulting to "schedutil" instead of the performance governor, weirdly enough.

        Also, running the command without specifying to use all available CPU cores/threads will successfully set the appropriate governor for all of them, anyway.

        So the better systemd service file should look like the following:

        Code:
        [Unit]
        Description=CPU performance governor
        [Service]
        Type=oneshot
        ExecStart=/usr/bin/cpupower frequency-set -g performance
        [Install]
        WantedBy=multi-user.target
        Cheers!​
        Nice one, I haven't needed any of this yet but copied it for future use

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        • #14
          Originally posted by slotdime View Post
          I want to configure it for always stay in "performance" mode and persist the configuration.
          For the time being, after turning on the pc, I run a script to change the governor (as root).

          #!/bin/bash
          echo "performance" | tee /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cpufreq/scaling_governor

          In case anyone have a better and more elegant solution, thanks in advance .
          Boot kernel parameter "cpufreq.default_governor=performance" works since Linux 5.9 (so even Debian 11 supports it).
          Code:
          sudo nano /etc/default/grub
          GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash cpufreq.default_governor=performance"
          Ctrl+s, Ctrl+x
          sudo update-grub

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Phil995511 View Post
            They are so busy doing this that they are neglecting the release of Debian 11.7 which was scheduled for mid-February ;-(
            No, it was never scheduled for mid-February. Up until yesterday or so, the page you linked read:
            stable (11.7) Not yet planned (maybe mid-February)
            Neither did anybody promise you anything, nor is anybody neglecting anything. If there are critical issues, they will be patched even before the next point release. And if there's a less critical fix waiting to be released with the next point release, you can always add the proposed-updates repository.

            In the meantime, the page was updated to show that the point release will happen on April, 29. Just relax


            P.S. Btw, it happens actually quite often that point releases are released later than the time estimated on the release page.
            Last edited by silentcreek; 18 March 2023, 08:34 PM.

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            • #16
              Been using Bookworm for a few weeks but then moved back to POP_OS! for the workstation. I will be installing BW on a old PowerMac G5 and also on a few build servers in the homelab I just procured off of fleabay. BW is more stable than most OSs I just rather use POP_OS! for its amazing user interface (I like it anways.)

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