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Fedora 38 Wants To Make Sure Shutdowns & Reboots Are Faster

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  • Fedora 38 Wants To Make Sure Shutdowns & Reboots Are Faster

    Phoronix: Fedora 38 Wants To Make Sure Shutdowns & Reboots Are Faster

    A change proposal to be evaluated still by FESCo would help ensure that system shutdowns and reboots can happen faster on Fedora Linux...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Yes, please.
    However, the truth is that [email protected] is the actual problem (often because a user app is idling and doesn't terminate when shutting down), This should not apply to other services as they may be actually shutting down or waiting for something to complete.
    Last edited by tildearrow; 23 December 2022, 07:13 AM.

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    • #3
      I've had this enabled for years:

      /etc/systemd/system.conf.d/system.conf
      [Manager]
      DefaultTimeoutStopSec=10s

      $HOME/.config/systemd/user.conf
      [Manager]
      DefaultTimeoutStopSec=10s


      Both are required.

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      • #4
        I think it would be less risky to gradually decrease the threshold, over several releases. Let's not forget that killing a program mid-operation can cause data loss/corruption.

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        • #5
          Ubuntu had something similar 12 years ago

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          • #6
            Originally posted by coder View Post
            I think it would be less risky to gradually decrease the threshold, over several releases. Let's not forget that killing a program mid-operation can cause data loss/corruption.
            Disagree. It would just spread the pain across many releases instead of dealing with one.

            Is there a way to specify the default at say 15s but then allow specific services (eg old pinephone modem firmware or libvirtd) have larger timeouts? If so, we can probably be aggressive and give the services that need more time more time instead of forcing everyone to match the slowest common denominator

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            • #7
              I've never seen a systemd system where a reboot took longer than a split second. Does it even stop services and unmount filesystems? I have to wonder what systems Fedora are using to get this 2 minute number from.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by coder View Post
                I think it would be less risky to gradually decrease the threshold, over several releases. Let's not forget that killing a program mid-operation can cause data loss/corruption.
                Defaults do matter.

                The vast majority of people out there expect their systems to shut down fast without any stupid delays.

                If you are a user of heavy applications requiring minutes to shutdown, you could deal with that on your own.

                Originally posted by some_canuck View Post
                I've never seen a systemd system where a reboot took longer than a split second. Does it even stop services and unmount filesystems? I have to wonder what systems Fedora are using to get this 2 minute number from.
                Over the past decade I've had multiple Fedora and not only Fedora applications misbehave and take forever to quit, including Google Chrome.

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                • #9
                  # uptime

                  12:53:38 up 667 days,
                  ‚Äč
                  yeah, sure, reboot timing is the biggest issue of Unix systems ;-)

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                  • #10
                    Strange, is this really a problem under Fedora? All distros I used so far had less than a second shutdown time on SSD. Under Windows it's quiet normal to come back to work and see the blue window "can't kill XY, force?" because you diddn't wait long enough for the PC to actually shut down.

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