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Debian To Carry Patches For GNOME Dynamic Triple Buffering

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  • #11
    03.png

    Based on a Linux gaming survey it does look like KDE is winning. If you click on the image it should take you to the source (first time linking an image here...). There are a lot of other really interesting stats here too. Though the sample size is small and likely does not involve much from the professional usage community (ex. juggernauts like Google and Facebook/Meta)/

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post
      Are you implying that they only care about their server distros, and intentionally ship junk and do no QA for the desktop distros where they have and continue to first-class GNOME, including the future Fedora 37 and Ubuntu 22.10 releases?
      Now we are talking :-)

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      • #13
        Originally posted by zexelon View Post
        its amazing! I have always struggled severely to work with Gnome
        Quotes like this have always amazed me, what are you people doing that makes he DE even remotely be a hindrance in your ability to conduct work. I mean basically the DE simply allows you to click on icons and launch applications (where the actual work is done).

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post

          Yep, I'm sure Canonical and Red Hat are jokes and don't care about end-users

          How many distros are first-classing KDE, and then how many of those distros are actually relevant?
          openSUSE and it's very relevant. Not only because of its history, but also because (at least here in Europe) it sees corporate use.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

            Quotes like this have always amazed me, what are you people doing that makes he DE even remotely be a hindrance in your ability to conduct work. I mean basically the DE simply allows you to click on icons and launch applications (where the actual work is done).
            And I am always baffled by these quotes

            The point is the DE should NEVER be a hindrance to productive work and Gnome often is. Gnome has never broken for me per say (except when Nautilus spaz'ed out last year on me and filled my whole drive space by writing to a log file continuously for several hours... that took a while to fix, an update appears to have solved that issue though).

            Take the following as a PERSONAL list of challenges I have had with Gnome:
            1. Key bindings in Gnome... this is a huge pain point, I can not for example rebind the "expose" key. In my job I have to alternate between many windows and tasks so I have found that binding as many of the DE functions to the mouse (i use a logitech MMO mouse to accelerate this) allows window management and alternating functions to happen much faster. For the life of me I could not re-bind the Gnome expose button. I found numerous hacks, but they were very glitchy.
            2. The nautilus file manager is just painful compared to dolphin. The "favourites" method in nautilus is glitchy i find, I also like the shortcuts in dolphin manager.
            3. Applications menu, yes this is a "traditional" desktop paradigm... its old, and Gnome seems to want to be edgy and current (whatever that means to them), but its effective and again I dont want my DE slowing me down in any way.
            4. This last one is really personal and pedantic... themes... Gnome just sucks to make it look remotely pleasing these days. I get it, we are all supposed to be using apps through our browser, electron, snap or some such thing, but there is still a place for making things look at least not ugly and somewhat uniform! I spend the vast majority of my day staring at the DE interface and its window manager... its nice to feel comfortable in it and never notice is because it is seamless and out of the way.
            Just my thoughts. I am very interested to see what Pop_OS does with Cosmic, they have been trying to get Gnome to fit their vision, but appear to have given up on that plan now.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              I wish they would care about KDE Plasma too as much as they care about Gnome!
              The whole PipeWire for Gnome only made me think they don't.
              Hey Danny3,

              KDE in Debian has always been with high quality.

              I've been using PipeWire on Debian testing with Wayland and KDE for almost an year so don't be afraid.

              Here is Wiki for PipeWire in Debian - https://wiki.debian.org/PipeWire

              This year I watched a video about Fedora launch (it was version 36 maybe) and the creator of PipeWire recommends using wireplumber instead of pipewire-media-session.

              HTH

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              • #17
                triple buffering sure is nice for lower end hardware, but if you are using lower end hardware, you have probably already been turned of gnome anyways. interesting to see if this can bring back some usefulness. is anyone shipping gnome triple buffer? just left fedora cause it was too unusable. (that and I missed arch on my tablet)

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
                  is anyone shipping gnome triple buffer? just left fedora cause it was too unusable. (that and I missed arch on my tablet)
                  Ubuntu 22.04 (and 22.10) is shipping it: https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/why-u...t-faster/30369

                  There's a Copr for Fedora: https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/co...gnome-patched/

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                    I wish they would care about KDE Plasma too as much as they care about Gnome!
                    The whole PipeWire for Gnome only made me think they don't.
                    It's not that they don't care about KDE Plasma, it's just that different DEs are maintained by different teams with different opinions. As I mentioned in the PipeWire for Debian thread, it's the default only on gnome because only the gnome maintainer decided to replace "Depends: pulseaudio" with "Depends: pipewire-pulse". For the most part, decisions are made individually by the respective package maintainers.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by zexelon View Post

                      And I am always baffled by these quotes

                      The point is the DE should NEVER be a hindrance to productive work and Gnome often is. Gnome has never broken for me per say (except when Nautilus spaz'ed out last year on me and filled my whole drive space by writing to a log file continuously for several hours... that took a while to fix, an update appears to have solved that issue though).

                      Take the following as a PERSONAL list of challenges I have had with Gnome:

                      1. Key bindings in Gnome... this is a huge pain point, I can not for example rebind the "expose" key. In my job I have to alternate between many windows and tasks so I have found that binding as many of the DE functions to the mouse (i use a logitech MMO mouse to accelerate this) allows window management and alternating functions to happen much faster. For the life of me I could not re-bind the Gnome expose button. I found numerous hacks, but they were very glitchy.
                      System Settings -> Keyboard -> "View and Customize Shortcuts" lets you remap basically any function, and even add your own shortcuts (e.g. I map `asusctl profile -n` to Fn+F5 so I can change fan/performance profiles on my Asus laptop). The only downside is that there doesn't seem to be an easy way to map to mouse buttons directly, but you could probably use something like AutoKey to map a mouse button to a keyboard combo, then tell Gnome how to interpret that keyboard combo.

                      2. The nautilus file manager is just painful compared to dolphin. The "favourites" method in nautilus is glitchy i find, I also like the shortcuts in dolphin manager.
                      Yeah, I'm not a huge fan of Nautilus either (lack of type-ahead is the main dealbreaker for me, so I just use Thunar instead).

                      3. Applications menu, yes this is a "traditional" desktop paradigm... its old, and Gnome seems to want to be edgy and current (whatever that means to them), but its effective and again I don't want my DE slowing me down in any way.
                      I can't really speak to this one, I always use the search myself as I find it way faster than clicking and scrolling through folders and lists to try to find what I'm looking for. (I have way too many applications installed, so at least for me a menu-based approach is a no-go.)

                      4. This last one is really personal and pedantic... themes... Gnome just sucks to make it look remotely pleasing these days. I get it, we are all supposed to be using apps through our browser, electron, snap or some such thing, but there is still a place for making things look at least not ugly and somewhat uniform! I spend the vast majority of my day staring at the DE interface and its window manager... its nice to feel comfortable in it and never notice is because it is seamless and out of the way.[/LIST]
                      Check out the newly-released Gradience for theming applications, for the shell itself, the Blur My Shell, Burn My Windows, and Desktop Cube extensions are some of my favorites. Blur My Shell makes the overview not filled with oppressive gray, which I very much appreciate. For Burn My Windows, I use Hexagon as my open-window effect, and TV effect for closing windows. It just adds a bit of nice flair without being too crazy, though of course you can totally go for crazy effects too. Desktop Cube is a nice modern take on the classic Compiz effect, it fits surprisingly nicely with Gnome's horizontal workspace paradigm.

                      Oh, and of course, don't forget to use Gnome Tweaks to set your system font as Comic Sans

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