Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ubuntu 20.04.5 LTS Released With Hardware Enablement Stack Backported From 22.04

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ubuntu 20.04.5 LTS Released With Hardware Enablement Stack Backported From 22.04

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 20.04.5 LTS Released With Hardware Enablement Stack Backported From 22.04

    For those planning to stick to the Ubuntu 20.04 "Focal Fossa" Long-Term Support series still for some time before moving to the newer Ubuntu 22.04 LTS series, Ubuntu 20.04.5 LTS is available today as the newest point release in that older series...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Ubuntu-20.04.5-LTS

  • #2
    I have to use Ubuntu 20.04 LTS for work.
    Kernel 5.15 was already released a while ago on the HWE channel. This allowed my HP Elitebook 845 G7 work laptop to finally suspend/resume.

    Comment


    • #3
      Michael

      Grammar

      "Yesterday there was last-minute rebuilds​".

      Either "Yesterday there was a last-minute rebuild​" (singular rebuild) or "Yesterday there were last-minute rebuilds​" (multiple rebuilds).

      Comment


      • #4
        Still at 5.15? My Tumbleweed is already at kernel 5.19.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
          Still at 5.15? My Tumbleweed is already at kernel 5.19.
          And a lot more likely to break, too. Anyone on an LTS doesn't want the bleeding edge kernel. They want the stable kernels that support their hardware and least likely to break what they already have installed. It's not rocket science.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

            And a lot more likely to break, too. Anyone on an LTS doesn't want the bleeding edge kernel. They want the stable kernels that support their hardware and least likely to break what they already have installed. It's not rocket science.
            But the 5.19 kernel is stable, it's not a development version huh!
            Which then you prefer an ancient kernel, is another matter.​

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

              And a lot more likely to break, too. Anyone on an LTS doesn't want the bleeding edge kernel. They want the stable kernels that support their hardware and least likely to break what they already have installed. It's not rocket science.
              I want a working system for my new laptop and with Fedora Silverblue I finally found it. It is much more stable than my Ubuntu ever was and I still enjoy support for my new hardware. I really think container based systems like Silverblue are the future.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
                But the 5.19 kernel is stable, it's not a development version huh!
                Which then you prefer an ancient kernel, is another matter.​
                Quit while you're behind. Learn the meaning of terms like 'backport' and 'LTS'. Understand that your case does not apply to everyone. Understand that the 5.15.x kernel is still actively supported by the kernel devs themselves: https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  patrick1946 Good for you. I don't agree. I've used both (container type and package manager type distribution systems). I think containers as currently implemented and often used are a solution to a problem that people largely made up to sell more solutions. The way you stated your issue seems to be more Ubuntu doing something wrong than Fedora Silverblue doing something right strictly because it's using flatpak. If Silverblue were using untested or poorly tested software or software with bad options it's going to have stability problems if it's using RPM or flatpak.

                  Charlie68 You still don't get it. A newly released kernel is not "stable". It's just minimally tested and the developers are hopeful they've got the most glaring bugs ironed out. There's no guarantee it's fit for any purpose other than it booted up on the developers' computers, appeared to run ok enough for Linus and the few people that tested it for Linus to release it. No one with half a brain is going to trust that with anything critical, and really shouldn't trust it with any computer they depend on everyday to get work done, either, critical or not, unless their job is to test those new software releases for breakage.

                  Tumbleweed and any other rolling release distros are a continually testing mode. Things break. Sometimes catastrophically so. It doesn't break enough to annoy you. Great! More power to you. But don't for a minute think that your little desktop experience is what anyone else is going to experience using Tumbleweed nor is everyone going to be as willing to take the same chances with their data or hardware.
                  Last edited by stormcrow; 01 September 2022, 05:21 PM. Reason: grammar

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JEBjames View Post
                    Michael

                    Grammar

                    "Yesterday there was last-minute rebuilds​".

                    Either "Yesterday there was a last-minute rebuild​" (singular rebuild) or "Yesterday there were last-minute rebuilds​" (multiple rebuilds).
                    Yep fixed, thanks.
                    Michael Larabel
                    https://www.michaellarabel.com/

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X