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An Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Fix Is Coming For A Very Annoying & Serious APT Problem

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  • Developer12
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post

    Well I can tell someone has never used Docker, Kubernetes, and similar infrastructure in a business environment.
    So you're using a stale container, and then trying to install packages in it while simultaneously being unable/unwilling to update it? A flimsy excuse.

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  • grok
    replied
    There are some kinds of safeguards or helps where in the terminal it tells you "run apt-get -f install to fix this". Once, something was wrong. There was a message telling "the packages something something database something packages. Please run apt-get something --fix-everything". It worked.
    Also you can do lazy things like apt-get upgrade && apt-get update && apt-get upgrade

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  • grok
    replied
    Originally posted by Sin2x View Post
    And they call it LTS...
    I believe they recommend waiting for 22.04.1 if you care about this.
    If you upgrade from LTS to LTS the upgrade is offered when .1 is out. This is not new and LTS always means freezing the bugs (and removing, maybe, some of them).

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  • kylew77
    replied
    Wow *buntu is going down hill. I first put my parents on 14.04 from Windows XP in Xubuntu but I'm not too sure I should update them to 22.04 later this year. You don't get problems like this in the *BSDs because base is seperate from ports. Heck with OpenBSD and NetBSD having Xorg in base you can never easily delete your basic gui even without trying real hard and removing a set.

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  • lowflyer
    replied
    At the beginning of my Linux career, APT was like a revelation to me. After some real daunting experiences with fedora, suse and some others, APT was the system that "just worked". And I stayed loyal to it for a long time. Over time I ran into issues like the one described here multiple times. Both on Ubuntu and Debian before that. This is the reason I moved over to the Arch universe. It's not without its own problems, but it's orders of magnitude better than apt/debian/ppt

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  • LightBit
    replied
    Something similar happed to me multiple times on Debian. I canceled it when I saw what it wants to do and upgraded all. Now I usualy upgrade all first.

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  • NotMine999
    replied
    Originally posted by DanL View Post

    This is not an Ubuntu-specific issue and it has nothing to do with snaps. https://salsa.debian.org/apt-team/ap...e_requests/248
    Someone doesn't understand a /sarcasm tag....

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  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
    So hang on.

    Michael doesn't bother to update the system after doing a clean install? And if you actually *do* do that, this bug doesn't manifest?

    What the hell is there to complain about then? The first thing you should be doing after installing the system, and especially before installing new packages, is updating everything. Sure, it's weird behavior, but it wouldn't be encountered if only people did the right thing (TM).
    Well I can tell someone has never used Docker, Kubernetes, and similar infrastructure in a business environment.

    Leave a comment:


  • openminded
    replied
    Originally posted by Sin2x View Post
    And they call it LTS...
    That stands for long term support, which effectively means that they will have to fix things like this for a very long time.

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  • Ironmask
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    Maybe you're not the target audience. Pacman or portage is great for ricers. Ubuntu is mainly targeting enterprises and inexperienced users.
    Simple to use systems should be built on top of complicated and customizable systems. You see this everywhere in engineering. Car engines have so many controls you wouldn't even be able to keep track all of them, but the computer abstracts it and maintains it for you. Computer libraries are similar, tons of options and controls, and sometimes they're even exposed as a command you can invoke in the shell, but mostly they're for other programs to abstract and control and condense their usefulness into one particular subset of functionality, without actually diminishing the functionality of the system it's using. Windows has a great example, it's Group Policy system is dizzying, you can control every inch of the OS and the network it's connected on from it, but Windows also comes with countless tools that only care about portions of it which makes it far more manageable to people with less requirements. You should never excuse a poorly-built and limited tool for such an asinine logical fallacy as "well do you really need it to work better? can't you just put up with it?"

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