Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Linux Mint 21 Is Going To Avoid systemd-oomd

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Linux Mint 21 Is Going To Avoid systemd-oomd

    Phoronix: Linux Mint 21 Is Going To Avoid systemd-oomd

    Linux Mint 21 is working its way toward release this summer as the latest version of this desktop OS that is being built atop Ubuntu 22.04 LTS. Unlike Ubuntu 22.04 upstream that is now using systemd-oomd by default on the desktop to try to improve the low memory / system memory pressure experience, Linux Mint has now decided to avoid this daemon due to user criticism...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...int-17-No-OOMD

  • #2
    And yet again, unlike Ubuntu, which stopped catering to the needs of regular desktop users years ago when they shifted their priorities towards the enterprise sphere, Linux Mint sticks to its roots as a regular desktop centric OS. Another thing I learned yesterday about Ubuntu 22.04 is that it doesn't ship with libfuse2 preinstalled, so Appimages don't work out of the box as a result. Regarding the official Ubuntu flavors, some of them ship with libfuse2 preinstalled like Ubuntu Mate, but others don't. So I wonder if Mint developers know about the libfuse2 situation.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yay !! More OOM drama ! I was polling for this.
      If there's something worth obsessing about and losing sleep, that's definitely it.
      I cannot think of anything else more important.
      I truly hope Phoronix will provide us daily news on this matter.
      If you are not filling all your RAM with programs, you are doing computing wrong.
      Last edited by bobbie424242; 02 July 2022, 08:10 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Between snaps, systemd-oomd, disagreements on the business model, etc, Mint's increasingly distancing itself from Ubuntu is delighting its users. When will a complete abandonment of Ubuntu to keep only Linux Mint Debian Edition ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by bobbie424242 View Post
          Yay !! More OOM drama ! I was polling for this.
          If there's something worth obsessing about and losing sleep, that's definitely it.
          I cannot think of anything else more important.
          I truly hope Phoronix will provide us daily news on this matter.
          If you are not filling all your RAM with programs, you are doing computing wrong.
          Well, it is drama when you're trying to get stuff done and OOMD decides to kill Firefox, Kate, or Dolphin. It killed both Kate and Dolphin during a system update yesterday. Luckily they were just sitting there minimized so they had their states saved long before being killed. I've had it kill Firefox due to copy/paste operations in Dolphin because highly compressing stuff with Zstd uses memory (RAW pictures to a Zstd compressing volume).

          Of all the random things I've learned about or enabled because of a Phoronix article, systemd-oomd is the one I regret the most.

          I'd rather my system just get funky and unresponsive for a minute or two than for OOMD to kill something off. I'd rather my system pull a Windows or an Apple and use some free drive space as temporary swap than to start killing stuff off. Windows gets a lot of things wrong, but this is one of the things where they get it right.

          And before the people buying 8GB HDD Chromebooks with 2GB of DDR2 and no expandable storage start posting: That's on y'all for buying such pieces of crap products that don't have the room for programs let alone swap. I get it. I don't have the biggest gadget budget so I buy crappy phones with minimal storage and rely on microSD cards.

          Just saying: When you buy low-end products, you have low-end problems.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Phil995511 View Post
            Between snaps, systemd-oomd, disagreements on the business model, etc, Mint's increasingly distancing itself from Ubuntu is delighting its users. When will a complete abandonment of Ubuntu to keep only Linux Mint Debian Edition ?
            That would be nice. I actually switched to Mint when LMDE came out. I left Mint because LMDE felt like a 2nd class citizen.

            Plus being a Yo Dawg OS has to have its disadvantages. You have to keep track of what Debian does and then see what Ubuntu does about it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Phil995511 View Post
              When will a complete abandonment of Ubuntu to keep only Linux Mint Debian Edition ?
              I guess it will happen only if Canonical will completely lose its mind and pull another deal breaking change like removing the remaining i386 packages (as it originally planned in 2019, but thankfully it didn't happen because of enormous backlash). Actually, I suspect that might be the reason they recently started making a Steam Snap, because Steam is probably the most important package that is 32 bit. So by making a Snap Steam, they will be able to proceed removing the remaining i386 packages, including Steam. I hope I'm wrong about this, but I just don't see any other reason why would they create a Steam Snap.
              Last edited by user1; 02 July 2022, 10:02 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Phil995511 View Post
                When will a complete abandonment of Ubuntu to keep only Linux Mint Debian Edition ?
                LMDE lags way behind on software versions. Unless they want to make it a rolling release based on testing or unstable, I don't see it as a good replacement.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mint's versioning utterly confuses me.

                  Ubuntu does it right with the YY:MM method. It's sweet, easy to read and once you learn that LTS is every april of an even year, you know all you need from 4 numbers.

                  Honestly I wish more software and OSes would switch to a date-based model for versioning.

                  Mint already copies Ubuntu in better, why go from Ubuntu 20 -> Mint 20 to Ubuntu 22 -> Mint 21? It's just needlessly confusing, and it's not like plain old versioning is a better way of doing this.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by user1 View Post
                    Actually, I suspect that might be the reason they recently started making a Steam Snap, because Steam is probably the most important package that is 32 bit.
                    To be quite honest I think Canonical has good reasons to smash some of that extremely aging legacy stuff. 64 bit was the standard over 10 years ago.

                    If anything, Valve and Canonical have forced the advancement of many Linux elements moreso than any distro.

                    Also will Steam actually leave its 32 bit husk someday or are we stuck with this thing forever? I know a fully native app with a marketplace connection, tons of features, friends list etc. is huge, and I imagine remaking it is a massive pain, but this is some 2003 or so software now. Surely there must be a solid dozen reasons to remake it with more modern stuff. What would a Qt5 based Steam be like?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X