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Ubuntu Developers Have An Idea For Handling The Over-Eager Systemd OOMD App Killing

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  • #11
    so solution they are after is to insert "avoid" directive into userspace systemd daemons files to workaround (or should we say, 'hack around') oomd killing apps without actually solving the problem with underlying heuristics/algorithm.

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    • #12
      I'm glad I didn't install a distro using this new "feature". I typically run Slack, Brave, Firefox, Chromium, Spotify, Discord and others on my host.

      I can't wait for Facebook's new memory swapping daemon to be activated on desktop systems by some crazy distro. /s

      Originally posted by rclark View Post
      Seems to me a solution to a non-problem. I mean memory is cheap and plentiful. If you experience out-of-memory problems, your machine isn't configured properly for the use case. Don't get it .
      My 2700X has 2 memory controllers. I loose "precious XMP/AMP timing" or system stability when if I go 4 DIMMs route. The idea is to stay as close to Infinity Fabric speeds as possible (3733Mhz for me) and drop latency as low as you can (CL14 for me). Low latency 2x32GB modules are pricey if you can find stock. The other option is Threadripper... well... that's considerably more $$$. I would love to go zen3 just for the improved UMC but I need two+ CCXs for my VMs. That means I need a 5900X or better and again that's expensive.

      I'm running multiple VMs including Windows gaming. Yesterday games used 8GB RAM, today some are using 12GB, and tomorrow games are using 16GB. Things change overtime.

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      • #13
        It works fine on 4gb ram on fedora. May be the Ubuntu is doing some funny things in background?

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        • #14
          Originally posted by arun54321 View Post
          It works fine on 4gb ram on fedora. May be the Ubuntu is doing some funny things in background?
          "Ah, snap!" (c) Ubuntu devs, probably

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          • #15
            Originally posted by hax0r View Post
            oomd killing apps without actually solving the problem with underlying heuristics/algorithm.
            If there is actually a problem with the algorithm or heuristics. Looks logical to me. Kill the process that keep requesting more memory = browser.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
              Just buy more RAM. It is cheap. A modern 2022 desktop should have 32GBs of RAM at the minimum.
              Well, my development machine from 2016 has 32 GiB and occasionally hits the limit because CLion likes eating RAM for breakfast and if you open multiple projects with large codebases oomd hits eventually.

              And this is a good thing. Otherwise the system would end up in a crawl and the machine would become unusable for minutes without reboot. That's why I configured the daemon in the first place.

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              • #17
                systemd oom has one job really: avoid the kernel oom killer waking up. If the apps causing out of memory are isolated from systemd killing, doesn't this just return us to the original problem, the invocation of the ponderous kernel oom killer?

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by oleid View Post

                  Well, my development machine from 2016 has 32 GiB and occasionally hits the limit because CLion likes eating RAM for breakfast and if you open multiple projects with large codebases oomd hits eventually.

                  And this is a good thing. Otherwise the system would end up in a crawl and the machine would become unusable for minutes without reboot. That's why I configured the daemon in the first place.
                  a couple of years ago, I killed my 64GB machine by printing a 700 page PDF. So since then I have had real swap and userspace killers, initially earlyoomd. You can always run out of ram. This is the problem with the macos approach, it is a hack. Maybe a pragmatic hack, but you could never use it on a server.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
                    Pfff, n00bs. Just get a faster internet connection and download more RAM.
                    You just invented the swapfile in the cloud.

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                    • #20
                      Why do engineers always assume that the end user is very stupid and can't make any rational decision? Just show a dialog to the user and let him choose what to kill.

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