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Fedora 36 Is A Terrific Release Especially For Linux Enthusiasts, Power Users

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  • #71
    Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post

    Just to specify that RPM Fusion and Packman are not third -party repositories, but community repositories.
    For the rest I use tumbleweed that being a rolling release everything is updated and I have never had problems.
    Anything not in the official repository is considered a third part package/third party repo if you needed to add one.

    RPM Fusion is a third party repository but a trustworthy one. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Third_party_repositories

    Pacman is a package manager, I assume you’re referring to the third party repo called AUR: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/uno...r_repositories

    I’ve had openSUSE tumbleweed installed for about 2 months now. Zypper is the slowest package manager I’ve ever used. I double checked my repos proximity. Today I installed ~2400 packages and that was about an hour. I’d prefer to use RHEL’s dnf rather than use Zypper, while Solus’ eopkg and Void’s xbps run circles around both of them.

    I’m looking forward to using SerpentOS but until then Solus has been the most stable rolling release I’ve used.

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    • #72
      Originally posted by WannaBeOCer View Post

      Anything not in the official repository is considered a third part package/third party repo if you needed to add one.

      RPM Fusion is a third party repository but a trustworthy one. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Third_party_repositories

      Pacman is a package manager, I assume you’re referring to the third party repo called AUR: https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/uno...r_repositories

      I’ve had openSUSE tumbleweed installed for about 2 months now. Zypper is the slowest package manager I’ve ever used. I double checked my repos proximity. Today I installed ~2400 packages and that was about an hour. I’d prefer to use RHEL’s dnf rather than use Zypper, while Solus’ eopkg and Void’s xbps run circles around both of them.

      I’m looking forward to using SerpentOS but until then Solus has been the most stable rolling release I’ve used.
      As always experiences can be profoundly different, when I tried Solus I had a lot of problems, so in the end I decided to change despite having placed many hopes in Solus, but I was deeply disappointed ..., now I am very happy with Tumbleweed that I use for 5 years now without problems.
      However, I was referring to the openSUSE packman repository, not Arch pacman.

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      • #73
        Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post

        As always experiences can be profoundly different, when I tried Solus I had a lot of problems, so in the end I decided to change despite having placed many hopes in Solus, but I was deeply disappointed ..., now I am very happy with Tumbleweed that I use for 5 years now without problems.
        However, I was referring to the openSUSE packman repository, not Arch pacman.
        Ah thanks for pointing out Packman, only third party repository I needed to add on Tumbleweed was the Nvidia repo. Aside from that I found everything I needed in the official repository. Which is most likely the reason I never needed to look up Packman. I use it for system administration and some gaming. openSUSE Tumbleweed has been stable for me as well. I just found the package manager slow compared to others I’ve used.
        Last edited by WannaBeOCer; 14 May 2022, 02:19 PM.

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        • #74
          Originally posted by WannaBeOCer View Post

          Ah thanks for pointing out Packman, only third party repository I needed to add on Tumbleweed was the Nvidia repo. Aside from that I found everything I needed in the official repository. Which is most likely the reason I never needed to look up Packman. I use it for system administration and some gaming. openSUSE Tumbleweed has been stable for me as well. I just found the package manager slow compared to others I’ve used.
          Users can use the new zypper backend which will be much faster, but is still in the testing phase at the moment.
          I am using it and have not had any problems.

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          • #75
            Originally posted by openminded View Post
            Let me show you what a user will do in such a case:
            Screenshot_20220512_144127.png
            That's not very "openminded" though

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            • #76
              Originally posted by reza View Post

              That's not very "openminded" though
              You're not the first one who makes pun of my nickname, but I'm telling you each and every time I laugh 'cause sometimes people confuse "openminded-ness" with tolerance. In this case - towards some bad design or worse, intentional annoying your users with pathetic statements - I mean those that I had quoted in my original reply. Not even taking into account the worst font anti-aliasing ever which made it into Gnome 42 this time - that's a plain insult of users right in their face (was discussed before and still present in the release).

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              • #77
                openminded All good. It was just a lighthearted tongue-in-cheek joke, just messing with ya! I'm a minimalist, so don't really use Gnome or KDE, but one of those niche WMs.

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                • #78
                  Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

                  Font rendering on Ubuntu sucks because it uses GTK. In my long-time experience, GTK font rendering always ranges from a little bad to very bad.
                  dunno. Ubuntu 22.04 sure looks good out of the box - easily rivalling, maybe surpassing, a mac. Can't think of any distro that comes close in terms of average-joe-like-me wow factor sophistication of the colour scheme, the rendering, the graphic design, the whole thing just feels so slick, and unlike every other distro and terminal emulator I've tried, I've never felt the need to play with the default font in Gnome Terminal on ubuntu. Just seems like someone with a Steve Jobs-like eye for visual appeal gives this thing a thorough parsing for a pleasing, organic experience that just doesn't need much tweaking, whereas so many other distros kind of seem to be stuck on boring corpo-Microsoft-like colours and crappy backgrounds picked from a last-minute google image search, not to mention terminal fonts that suck.

                  IBM actually has a pretty good history of being very design-aware, even in their staid corpo way, with things like the PS/2 and even OS/2, the Z-enterprise systems, and some striking websites, not to mention IBM Plex Mono, that look like having actually had money thrown at the design. Maybe they'll influence Fedora in the right way 'cos this 36 doesn't look great from the screenshots I see.
                  Last edited by vegabook; 16 May 2022, 06:30 PM.

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