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Ubuntu Outlines How To Use Its Real-Time Kernel Beta - It Requires Ubuntu Advantage

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  • #11
    Originally posted by MorrisS. View Post
    If the kernel implementing the real time is superior, why doesn't Ubuntu apply it as default?
    I/O throughput is lower on RT kernels.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      The only problem with Real Time Patches is you have to use CFS with them. If you have a spiffy BMQ or Cacule or Whatever Scheduler setup, it's heavily suggested to go back to CFS else there may be dragons. I'm rocking BMQ myself.
      Well not really, CacULE does work with RT kernels, as does it's successor the TT-scheduler. They have RT patches. I have used them both on an RT kernel and know others that still do.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by rmnscnce View Post

        I/O throughput is lower on RT kernels.
        Not only that, many drivers do not work on RT kernels as well. For example if you have Nvidia hardware, you cannot use their drivers on an RT kernel, it won't boot. Many other pieces of software also have trouble with RT kernels and will crash or cause data corruption.

        So if you have a use case for an RT kernel (low latency is key), go ahead and use it, but for general purpose computing, normal (non RT) kernels are superior.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
          Went on a bid yesterday..
          Why not just try to get Linux sysadmin job?

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          • #15
            Originally posted by MorrisS. View Post
            If the kernel implementing the real time is superior, why doesn't Ubuntu apply it as default?
            It's not superior. It's a very specific type of software for specific industrial uses. If you don't know what it is now, you'll probably never need it, and it would not make any sense in general-purpose use.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by rmnscnce View Post

              I/O throughput is lower on RT kernels.
              Not only IO, throughput at large is lower on RT include cpu only work.

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              • #17
                I got the free tier to test out live patching just before 22.04 landed... and pre-release has no live patching so couldn't test it. Well, I couldn't test it in the environment I wanted, which is effectively the same thing.

                I'm probably going to piece together a headless box to actually test this with, though.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by hax0r View Post
                  Why not just try to get Linux sysadmin job?
                  Last time I looked, a month or two ago, the nearest Linux jobs were at least 50 miles away, one way. Due to that I would have to have a remote position. The biggest problem is that I have no Linux credentials what-so-ever. The only degree I have is from a vocational school for digital desktop publishing (editing and layout) from nearly 22 years ago and that has no Linux relevance at all unless I happen to get a job at sites like Phoronix and GamingOnLinux or Red Hat, AMD, or other open source friendly companies for the position of editor, writer, proofreader, layout, design, or other mental or creative tasks along those lines.

                  Basically, unless one of y'all happens to be a hiring manager and wants to take a shot in the dark, the actual role of sys admin isn't an option right now with my current location and credentials. Also, I'm better suited towards those tasks above or, unfortunately, as local tech support. I have next to no experience in networking, working with multiple computers, or remote administration.

                  For bonus points, I literally mean in the dark...aside from three dots from my TrackIR clip. All I have is a PS3 camera with the IR filter removed and replaced with VHS cassette tape to act as an IR band-pass filter for my opentrack setup.

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