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Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Now Available For Download

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  • JMB9
    replied
    I am not impressed of this release in particular an and the state of Ubuntu/Canonical in general.
    As I have expressed before on Phoronix the installer regressed heavily after 20.10 STS - I thought it is the new installer - but from the remark to my
    bug report (classified the report as "invalid") was clear that it is the old one. So if they are working on a new one and targeted 22.04 LTS, why
    did they ruin the current installer?

    o Installer (22.04 experience was with Kubuntu beta imgage dating 18.04.2022 ... 3 day before the release date!):
    - the partitions are no longer shown entirely - only the first few (21.04 and also 22.04 LTS)
    - no longer a line to type to test keyboard setting - but only a layout which doesn't mean anything
    - if DisplayPort and HDMI are connected, on the installer is not visible on the Display Port screen (21.04 STS after release)
    - the installer crashed when looking an partitions (21.10 STS after release)
    - I always used /dev/sda as boot loader device (and he looked for the efi partition there) - since 21.04 STS the installer crashes when using this default.
    I was astonished that the partition the new Ubuntu gets freshly installed is ok - both choices cause the same warning, but only the 1st crashes the installer.
    And without data or reason, as is given explicitly.

    o Documentation:
    - a document stating installer for 21.04 and 21.10 showed images of 20.10 or before
    - the only installer manual found was for 20.04 LTS

    o Snap:
    - I have no problem if this is an option - but forcing this crap (not using system libraries, using sandboxing techniques not suitable for increasing security on the desktop but to destroy performance and causing trouble if it should interact with other disto programs - and flatpak is the pretty similar in that respect - just a stupid idea) is not ok.

    o Bug Reports:
    - My first bug report (12/2012) took time ... but it was addressed (a TeXLive problem concerning English language and A4 paper format).
    - All bug reports thereafter caused no real action - and no positive change ... so just a waste of time on my side.
    - And the last one for the installer of 22.04 LTS was even labeled "invalid" and I was asked to send in all installer problems separately (would have laughed if this would have been demanded by IBM, HP or Sun).
    * Testers are normally paid - and showing this kind of disrespect is not ok. And hinting to volunteers dealing with this bug reports is just crazy - at least concerning an LTS release!

    o Quality (package management / PPAs / HW support):
    - There had been several releases were the dependencies were wrong (after release - even after xx.04.1 release - causing to select X.org and other
    decisive components for deletion - no joke!). And yes, I am installing a lot of packages - but in former times this caused no problem at all.
    - They deliberately spoiled their kernel PPA as 5.11.16 (26. May 2021) was the last kernel to be installer under 18.04 LTS or 20.04 LTS - both still maintained,
    due to problems with dependencies.
    - They use LTS kernel for 20.04 LTS as well as 22.04 LTS - which are really ancient - if you have new HW. I needed 20.04.2 to use my Navi 10 without having
    to use Kernel PPA (at least it worked at the beginning ... cough) and Mesa PPA to have a stable and performant system.
    I tried to reach out - even Shuttleworth - to switch to a rolling base of kernel and mesa - as from my experience this causes no problem at all (.1 mesa and .3 linux
    would be on the safe side - so a real HWE support) - but it seems only IoT and such stuff do matter today - the desktop is a burden and the approach to stop delivering
    32 bit libs with 20.04 LTS (and stop gaming support) was not just thinking - it was a test how far one can go with reducing support.

    From my point of view the quality of Ubuntu gets similar to Windows ... I am not used that a GNU/Linux system can crash - and the same is true for programs under it.

    If Ubuntu works for you - I am happy ... but I will have to look for alternatives at it definitively does not work without enormous additional work for me - and I may be switching to Debian ...
    Maybe KDE neon due in several months (after .1 is released) can fix some of those things deliberately broken by Canonical/Ubuntu.
    Especially as the KDE neon (rolling KDE stack on 20.04.1+ LTS) was really stable and caused no problems I could spot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
    And Kubuntu because I like stable functional workflows and being a gnome user is even worse than being beta tester.
    As an ex-Kubuntu user I can't agree. There were always some problems while KDE worked fine everywhere else. It could be old Qt version shipped with Kubuntu. However, I switched to Gnome (generic, not Ubuntu mod) and really like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chugworth
    replied
    For several years I bounced back and forth between Debian and Ubuntu on critical servers, but these days I'm pretty much settled on Ubuntu since it's the best way to get ZFS.
    Last edited by Chugworth; 21 April 2022, 05:00 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • howarth
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post
    This doesn't seem to be correct. Someone mentioned that the change was reverted, and I also don't see that in the release notes: https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/jammy...-notes/24668/1
    • The default session for most systems that don’t have an Nvidia graphics card is now Wayland. If you need a non-Wayland session, you can choose the Ubuntu on Xorg session by clicking the gear button after selecting your name on the login screen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sin2x
    replied
    Originally posted by Melcar View Post

    It's not my main driver, but I do experiment with it and sometimes spend an entire weekend using it just for casual stuff. It's very good and have not experienced problems. For "casual" use I think it ticks all boxes. Big negatives for me are really slow installation and the base package selection from their repos is not that great in terms of variety. Of course, with OBS and Flatpaks it does not really matter (unless you for some reason don't want to use those options).
    Thanks for the input. I'll have to give it a spin some day as packages in Tumbleweed are fresher than in Debian testing, but stability is a concern -- I don't want to tinker with the system from time to time like you have to with Arch.

    Leave a comment:


  • zexelon
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    What changes? Is it better than the 5.17 kernels in rolling release distros?
    To be honest, probably not. Rolling distros have lots of cutting edge top notch stuff in them... statistically they are also more prone to user induced unintentional breakage. This is in no way a knock against rolling distros, they have their place and can be awesome, but like everything they have their "side affects".

    I used to be a die hard Gentoo fanatic... until I needed things to not break... and not take several days to get working again when they did break.

    So short answer, 22.04 has a lot of improvements over 21.04 and that's exciting!

    Leave a comment:


  • Melcar
    replied
    Originally posted by Sin2x View Post

    Have you tried their rolling Tumbleweed? I wonder how stable it is for casual use.
    It's not my main driver, but I do experiment with it and sometimes spend an entire weekend using it just for casual stuff. It's very good and have not experienced problems. For "casual" use I think it ticks all boxes. Big negatives for me are really slow installation and the base package selection from their repos is not that great in terms of variety. Of course, with OBS and Flatpaks it does not really matter (unless you for some reason don't want to use those options).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sin2x
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    I personally have switched to openSUSE Leap as a reliable non-rolling distro, and it's way better than Ubuntu.
    Have you tried their rolling Tumbleweed? I wonder how stable it is for casual use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sin2x
    replied
    Originally posted by arizone View Post

    please, elaborate
    Ubuntu snapped like a dry twig. The last decent release was 18.04, after that it all went steadily downhill. No real innovation, weird decisions like introducing mandatory snap-packagesand just a feeling that something is not right. So I switched and now am extremely happy with my Xfce on Debian testing.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by ping-wu View Post
    Ubuntu sucks. Each Ubuntu upgrade sucks more. Morale is low. Too much internal politics, top management too obsessed with IPO that may or many not happen and is running this the once-ubiquitous distro into a pit hole. Have been using Debian-non-free 12 "bookworm" for a while (dual-booting 11 "bullseye" just in case).. No looking back.
    I personally have switched to openSUSE Leap as a reliable non-rolling distro, and it's way better than Ubuntu.
    Doesn't break too often, and its package manager is leaps better.

    Package dependency error?
    APT (Debian/Ubuntu): "held broken packages" and leaves system in broken state. Fixing it automatically sometimes triggers the uninstallation of the entire system.
    Pacman (Arch): Aborts installation/removal without breaking system. Nice
    ZYpp (SUSE): Asks you whether to install it anyway or cancel the operation. Nice.
    Last edited by tildearrow; 21 April 2022, 07:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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