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Arch-Based EndeavourOS "Apollo" Released

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  • lumks
    replied
    Originally posted by getaceres View Post

    I wouldn't recommend the default Fedora experience either. Most people will come from Windows or Mac so KDE, Cinnamon, XFCE and any other classic DE will be immediately familiar for them.
    ¹You're probably not right on this. There is a thing, similar to the "uncanny valley", where you think you know how to deal with something but you actually can't. Like when you switch the keyboard layout from german to english or something. It's often just easier, especially for people with a lot of muscle-memory to start fresh with something instead of do slight adaptions all over the place. I just realized this myself. My switch from Windows 7 to GNOME took probably 1 month to feel comfortable. Compared to my switch from GNOME Shell on Ubuntu to GNOME Shell on Arch, where I do even after 3 years still try to run apt install now and then, because it's muscle memory.

    Try to tell a newbie that comes from Windows that now you won't have a taskbar (or that it's always hidden and that you have to go to the opposite side of the screen to make it visible) and that you won't have a system tray either.
    No Problem on that "This is not Windows". Done.

    That some applications (like HP printers software) will open with errors and some other won't open at all because they are using a wrong approach
    What are you talking about?

    and a system tray is something that must be avoided.
    I dont tell them anything about this, they dont care and they wont have a tray to beginn with. So why even mentioning it? I dont mention that there is no Microsoft Office around and thats fine.

    They won't care about it. They just want their software to work
    And this works pretty good.

    in a familiar environment.
    Don't let them fool you, they dont care about the environment. Nobody cares if it's Windows, Android, iOS or some random Linux, as long as they can get the work done.

    Using KDE will be much simpler for anyone that comes from Windows or Mac than GNOME.
    GOTO ¹

    Leave a comment:


  • Melcar
    replied
    Tried the new ISO on a VM over the weekend. Not much to say other than a slightly updated Calamares. I guess the biggest change is the additional software installation option on the Welcome application. Before it would give you a few options but now it launches a new window with several options. They took a cue from Garuda, but Garuda offers more options for software. Odd that they omitted AKM in this new launcher.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    I always find it funny that some people won't recommend KDE to newbies because it's supposedly too "complicated" and "customizable". Yet most newbies are coming from Windows. As if Windows isn't complicated...
    Modern Windows is a bit schizophrenic. It holds your hand and treats you like an idiot for some stuff, but then makes other things so painfully convoluted it's endlessly frustrating.

    Usually disabling all of the "telemetry" (read: spying and monetisation)...

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by getaceres View Post

    I wouldn't recommend the default Fedora experience either. Most people will come from Windows or Mac so KDE, Cinnamon, XFCE and any other classic DE will be immediately familiar for them. Try to tell a newbie that comes from Windows that now you won't have a taskbar (or that it's always hidden and that you have to go to the opposite side of the screen to make it visible) and that you won't have a system tray either. That some applications (like HP printers software) will open with errors and some other won't open at all because they are using a wrong approach and a system tray is something that must be avoided. They won't care about it. They just want their software to work in a familiar environment. Using KDE will be much simpler for anyone that comes from Windows or Mac than GNOME.
    I always find it funny that some people won't recommend KDE to newbies because it's supposedly too "complicated" and "customizable". Yet most newbies are coming from Windows. As if Windows isn't complicated...

    Leave a comment:


  • getaceres
    replied
    Originally posted by lumks View Post
    I wouldn't recommend KDE Plasma for a newbie to beginn with and for a distro clearly Fedora as it's the perfect mix of stability, fresh software and working half-automatic (on shutdown) update mechanism.
    I wouldn't recommend the default Fedora experience either. Most people will come from Windows or Mac so KDE, Cinnamon, XFCE and any other classic DE will be immediately familiar for them. Try to tell a newbie that comes from Windows that now you won't have a taskbar (or that it's always hidden and that you have to go to the opposite side of the screen to make it visible) and that you won't have a system tray either. That some applications (like HP printers software) will open with errors and some other won't open at all because they are using a wrong approach and a system tray is something that must be avoided. They won't care about it. They just want their software to work in a familiar environment. Using KDE will be much simpler for anyone that comes from Windows or Mac than GNOME.

    Leave a comment:


  • lumks
    replied
    Originally posted by RejectModernity View Post

    And what would you recommend with KDE for a newbie?
    I wouldn't recommend KDE Plasma for a newbie to beginn with and for a distro clearly Fedora as it's the perfect mix of stability, fresh software and working half-automatic (on shutdown) update mechanism.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by Melcar View Post
    If one knows what he/she is doing then the AUR posses little to no danger, but for users that are just getting acquainted with Linux (or careless users in general) it can easily lead to a broken system. Then again, so can PPAs and stuff from OBS.
    Bit like reading the PKGBUILD to make sure there's nothing nasty hiding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Melcar
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    I don't think i've ever had an issue with an AUR package outside of my own doing aside from pipewire full git personally, and I do use quite a number of them
    If one knows what he/she is doing then the AUR posses little to no danger, but for users that are just getting acquainted with Linux (or careless users in general) it can easily lead to a broken system. Then again, so can PPAs and stuff from OBS.

    Leave a comment:


  • elatllat
    replied
    yay

    but I rather the larger curated repo of Debian over the free-for-all of AUR/PPA/etc

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Yeah, AUR is great, that's for sure! That's the only slight con of openSUSE. But we were talking about newbies. I wouldn't recommend AUR to newbies anyway.
    I don't think i've ever had an issue with an AUR package outside of my own doing aside from pipewire full git personally, and I do use quite a number of them

    Leave a comment:

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