Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Beta Released With Many Improvements

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • royce
    replied
    I don't get it either. Seems like the main developer made a change he only understands and can't quite see why blurry fonts are a problem. Instead of admitting either his implementation or the whole idea is just plain wrong, as evidenced by the crap font rendering.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bilbo Baggins
    replied
    Originally posted by royce View Post
    The gitlab thread you posted on blurry fonts was updated just 3 hours ago with a potential fix, here's hoping.
    Yesterday's update addressed a different issue, and seems to have disappeared -- probably moved to a more appropriate thread.
    The problem blurring all text in GTK4 remains.
    A developer put in a lot of work to fix this a year ago, and apparently created a patch that solves the problem, but the maintainer shot the patch down:
    https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/-..._requests/3393
    It's a bizarre situation, and I'm at a loss why those in power at GNOME show so little interest in fixing such a harmful regression, helping others to fix it, or even _allowing_ others to fix it.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by Schmellow View Post

    It's a moderately well known issue/notabug/feature of gtk4 font rendering (https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/-/issues/3787)

    There is a workaround (https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/-...7#note_1280247) and Fedora may include it F36 (https://pagure.io/fedora-workstation/issue/295)
    The gitlab thread you posted on blurry fonts was updated just 3 hours ago with a potential fix, here's hoping.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by wooque View Post

    I use bluetooth audio for years and never had problem on Pulseaudio, as well with power consumption. Pipewire is better technically wise, but I didn't notice anything when I switched except it's started to automatically switch to Bluetooth audio when connected (at least on GNOME)
    Pulseaudio does not work with higher quality codecs like sbc-xq. It also has trouble switching modes when the device is a headset and you need full duplex - you end up with very low quality audio on the playback and on recording. This is a massive issue for me as I work remotely and constantly perusing my bluetooth headset. I switched to pipewire just last week to see just how it works in my system and it works beautifully - 6 months ago that wasn't the case. My bose nc700 finally work properly and automatically switches audio modes when pipewire detects a call being made (works with firefox & google meet for starters).

    Leave a comment:


  • Siuoq
    replied
    Originally posted by Drago View Post

    You don't need to settle with U16, there is Ubuntu Unity distro, that slaps Unity 7 over official Ubuntu. I am using it right now.
    I am using Ubuntu Unity 20.04 since more than a year as my primary system as well. Fun fact: it's created by a 12 y.o. kid

    Leave a comment:


  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by Amano View Post
    esa-va-drivers/jammy,now 22.0.0-0ubuntu2 amd64
    My tired brain works in funny ways.

    "esa" and "v" and "drivers" in the same line? → VESA drivers! → SciTech Display Doctor!

    (Also EISA)

    Leave a comment:


  • Bilbo Baggins
    replied
    Originally posted by openminded View Post

    Is it me or there's something terribly wrong with fonts in GTK4 apps? They look awful on FHD displays. No matter if app is flatpak or not, some parts are just blurry as hell.
    No, it's not just you. Unlike GTK3, GTK4 doesn't use subpixel rendering to display text. As a result, text is unnecessarily blurred along the horizontal axis on standard displays and monitors -- probably well over 90% of laptop and desktop displays currently in use. At 96ppi and 115ppi, the blurring is obtrusive. At 165ppi, the blurring is subtle but still a source of eyestrain. I haven't tested on anything higher than 165ppi because that's the highest resolution display I have. A back-of-the-envelope calculation (20/20 vision at 50cm viewing distance) suggests the difference in text rendering between GTK3 and GTK4 should stop mattering on displays that are >350ppi. By contrast, text on GTK3 is tack-sharp on my 96ppi external monitor, except for a faint trace of colour fringing on a few glyphs (letters) in very small, compact fonts where vertical elements are thinner than one pixel wide (GTK4 renders the same glyphs as a mushy grey smear).

    Leave a comment:


  • Bilbo Baggins
    replied
    Originally posted by Schmellow View Post

    It's a moderately well known issue/notabug/feature of gtk4 font rendering (https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/-/issues/3787)

    There is a workaround (https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/-...7#note_1280247) and Fedora may include it F36 (https://pagure.io/fedora-workstation/issue/295)
    Thanks, but that tweak only addresses ~5% of GTK4's blurry text rendering problem. I did a side-by-side comparison GTK3 vs GTK4 this week, and most of the blurriness was due to GTK4's failure to use subpixel rendering.

    Leave a comment:


  • andreyponomarenko
    replied
    Contributing to https://github.com/linuxhw/TestCover...t/Ubuntu_22.04
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install hw-probe --no-install-recommends
    sudo -E hw-probe -all -upload

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    Latency - not ready for professional audio applications
    Which was never the goal of Pulse in the first place. Which of course doesn't make it "false" as such but the "not ready" part is kinda disingenuous when it was never the goal.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X