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Debian 12.0 "Bookworm" Looks Like It Will Release Around Mid-2023

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  • Debian 12.0 "Bookworm" Looks Like It Will Release Around Mid-2023

    Phoronix: Debian 12.0 "Bookworm" Looks Like It Will Release Around Mid-2023

    While Debian 11 "Bullseye" released just last August, there is already talk of development milestone dates for Debian 12 "Bookworm" for a likely release in 2023...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...entative-Dates

  • #2
    Already??

    We barely got Debian testing back up running. Maybe it is just me but Pipewire, Gnome 42, and Nvidia 510 are all being worked on and things seem to move quite a bit (in all rolling release distros).

    I would love a Debian Rolling (Debian Testing without freeze)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mppix View Post
      Already??
      This is next year. It's one full year until the full freeze.

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      • #4
        My servers are rock solid with 11. They can take their sweet time.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mppix View Post
          Already??

          We barely got Debian testing back up running. Maybe it is just me but Pipewire, Gnome 42, and Nvidia 510 are all being worked on and things seem to move quite a bit (in all rolling release distros).

          I would love a Debian Rolling (Debian Testing without freeze)
          This already exists. It's called Debian unstable aka Debian Sid.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by partcyborg View Post
            This already exists. It's called Debian unstable aka Debian Sid.
            I guess you can argue that Sid is like Arch's main repository and experimental is like Arch's testing repository.

            But I don't really think it's meant to be like that. I used to have Sid on my desktop for a while, but I never found it very stable between updates. You do really need to take care of your installation because things break very often. That's because, according to Debian, Sid is "a rolling development version of the Debian distribution".

            It just feels like that, a development version. It does not feel like a real rolling release distribution. But I guess that's just my opinion (and experience).
            Last edited by EvilHowl; 15 March 2022, 04:05 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by EvilHowl View Post

              I guess you can argue that Sid is like Arch's main repository and experimental is like Arch's testing repository.

              But I don't really think it's meant to be like that. I used to have Sid on my desktop for a while, but I never found it very stable between updates. You do really need to take care of your installation because things break very often. That's because, according to Debian, Sid is "a rolling development version of the Debian distribution".

              It just feels like that, a development version. It does not feel like a real rolling release distribution. But I guess that's just my opinion (and experience).
              Same here. After my initial distro hopping I settled on Debian. That worked well for a while, years, until I started getting into Wine, Linux gaming, and trying to replay Morrowind and actually finish it (Narrator: He hasn't finished it). In hopes to get newer software faster I tried out their testing and Sid repos and ended up having some issue causing me to reinstall every few months. This was back around 2003-2008. Even distributions like Siduction that tried to wrangle Debian Sid eventually went Unstable true to the Sid name.

              IMHO, only Ubuntu has wrangled in Sid. The problem with Ubuntu, first tried it around 2005 or 2006, is that they add all these helpers...scripts, pre-configurations, etc...that remove the user from the system and knowing what's going on. Basically, you made Debian yours while with Ubuntu you make theirs work for you. That was right before Ubuntu went full NIH Syndrome which has it's own set of complaints I'm not going to go into.

              15 years later, I'd pick Linux Mint, not LMDE, but just standard Mint, if I wanted a stable Debian Sid OS. Ubuntu wrangles Sid and adds Ubuntu bullshit. Linux Mint removes most of that bullshit and adds a small bit of their own. Ergo -- Linux Mint is a stabilized Debian Sid with a spiffy Cinnamon desktop.

              I doubt people who actually suggest running Debian Testing or Sid have actually ran either of them for multiple years at a time. They might work well after the install and for a few months after, but they're not designed to be an everyday, stable, rolling release distribution nor do the have the longevity or stability of an actual rolling release distribution; especially as a desktop.

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              • #8
                We have been running Debian Bookworm, in the form or Sid, or Debian Unstable, since Bullseye came out last August. It definitely had some rough edges in the first few months (because of the transition), but has been rock solid at least since the beginning of this year.

                One reason we decided to migrate to Sid is because all our office machines have upgraded to AMD Ryzen. Sid works great for new Ryzen machines.

                Another reason is ibus-libpinyin 1.12.1. For Chinese locale users, since we have to use Chinese input tools everyday, this makes Bookworm actually more stable than Bullseye or Ubuntu 20.04LTS.

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                • #9
                  I hope Wayland will then be the default...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ping-wu View Post
                    We have been running Debian Bookworm, in the form or Sid, or Debian Unstable, since Bullseye came out last August. It definitely had some rough edges in the first few months (because of the transition), but has been rock solid at least since the beginning of this year.

                    One reason we decided to migrate to Sid is because all our office machines have upgraded to AMD Ryzen. Sid works great for new Ryzen machines.

                    Another reason is ibus-libpinyin 1.12.1. For Chinese locale users, since we have to use Chinese input tools everyday, this makes Bookworm actually more stable than Bullseye or Ubuntu 20.04LTS.
                    I'm running Bullseye on a Ryzen 9 3950X and it's been awesome.

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